The plantation sector demands the creation of a voluntary carbon trading market








Picture of carbon emissions





The plantation sector, reeling from the effects of changing weather patterns and volatile price trends, on Tuesday pleaded with the government for the creation of a voluntary carbon market in the country so that beleaguered growers can monetize the carbon sequestration potentials of their growing areas of crops like tea, coffee, rubber and spices, among others.












Stakeholders in the plantation sector debated opportunities to harness the potential of the carbon market for the sector at a seminar organized by the Indian Institute of Plantation Management Bengaluru in collaboration with the United Planters Association of South India ( UPASI) and the Indian Tea Association.

Need to have an institutional mechanism for carbon trading

UPASI President, MP Cherian, stressed the importance of a policy that allows agricultural plantations to trade sequestered carbon. “It is high time for the Indian government to establish a clear framework and procedure for the country’s voluntary carbon market,” added Cherian.

While acknowledging that climate change has had an undeniable negative influence on agriculture, Cherian said it has increased yield uncertainty in plantation crops.

While acknowledging that climate change has had an undeniable negative influence on agriculture, Cherian said it has increased yield uncertainty in plantation crops.












“Various studies have shown that plantation crops, which are fast-growing perennial species with a reduced tillage system, can sequester a significant amount of carbon. While rubber plantations offer the maximum carbon sequestration per hectare , other plantation crops such as tea, coffee, cardamom, and cocoa also have the ability to sequester carbon.Polyculture, intercropping, and agroforestry are polyculture approaches that can enhance these qualities.“, according to Cherian.

ITA General Secretary Arijit Raha stressed the importance of aligning the plantation sector with the government’s goal of becoming net zero by 2070. Compared to other companies, the industry tea has an advantage in terms of carbon status, according to Raha.

According to 2013 ITA research, Raha claims that the tea industry is carbon positive due to its operations. “Our carbon sequestration far exceeds our emissions. In some ways, we are ahead of the curve. “We have to figure out how to use status to our advantage,” Raha remarked.

Also, when it comes to carbon trading, Raha believes a vehicle should be put in place to connect the tea industry to the carbon market. He asked the experts to consider the role that industry associations such as UPASI and ITA could play in getting things done within the context of existing government rules.












In his opening speech, Santosh Kumar, Managing Director, Harrisons Malayalam Ltd, highlighted the importance of having an institutional structure for carbon trading in the country. “We need to develop a very strong voluntary carbon trading market in the country,” Kumar said, adding that such a system would strike the right balance between development and conservation. “People will be able to trade carbon credits and get paid for the carbon they sequester, and industries will be able to buy those credits and meet their commitments.”

Professor VG Dhanakumar, Director of the IIPMB, said his organization will prepare a white paper on the potential of the carbon market in the agriculture sector, which will be presented to the Ministries of New and Renewable Energy and Agriculture. and farmer welfare for further action. .

Anjana Sharma, DGM, Climate Services Division, KBS Certification, spoke about the steps involved in the development, validation and certification of carbon projects. Kundan Burnwal, Advisor, Climate Change, GIZ Germany, spoke about the monetization aspects of carbon credits for agricultural plantations, while Kundan Burnwal, Advisor, Climate Change, GIZ Germany, spoke about the monetization aspects of carbon credits for plantations agricultural.

TV Ramachandra from IISc’s Energy and Wetlands Research Group gave a presentation on budgeting in Central Western Ghats plantations, while Ketan Patel from Jalinga Tea Estate shared his experiences on transitioning to farming and reducing emissions in the tea value chain.












N Anil Kumar, Senior Director of MSSRF, discussed the benefits and relevance of carbon sequestration in the coffee industry. The potential for carbon credit in forestry was discussed by Tulika Biswas, Team Leader, Nature-Based Solutions, WeAct Pty Ltd, Australia. Mangalam Timber Plants consultant, Prem Shankar Prasad, spoke about the company’s techniques for earning carbon credits from plantations. UNCCD consultant Ishwar Narayanan presented carbon markets for landscape restoration and biodiversity.






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