Vineyard – Malcolm Blue Farm http://malcolmbluefarm.com/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 18:46:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-14.png Vineyard – Malcolm Blue Farm http://malcolmbluefarm.com/ 32 32 Land Bank wants agricultural lease proposals https://malcolmbluefarm.com/land-bank-wants-agricultural-lease-proposals/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 18:46:12 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/land-bank-wants-agricultural-lease-proposals/ Martha’s Vineyard Land Bank offers agricultural leases for 0.5 acres on Sweetened Water Preserve in Edgartown, 7.6 acres on Short Cove Preserve in West Tisbury and three acres on Peaked Hill Reservation in Chilmark. Full Requests for Proposals (RFPs) are available upon request and are on the MV Times website (see for Sweetened conservation water, […]]]>

Martha’s Vineyard Land Bank offers agricultural leases for 0.5 acres on Sweetened Water Preserve in Edgartown, 7.6 acres on Short Cove Preserve in West Tisbury and three acres on Peaked Hill Reservation in Chilmark. Full Requests for Proposals (RFPs) are available upon request and are on the MV Times website (see for Sweetened conservation water, Short Cove Preserveand Peaked Hill Reservation).

The terms are from January 1, 2023 to December 31, 2027. If both parties agree, the end date of the term can be extended until December 31, 2031. Prospective bidders must “specify how they will operate the lease” , such as crop details. or livestock, and whether new infrastructure will be needed, such as wells or fencing. Bids must not “contain any non-agricultural material” and “comply” with Land Bank policies, specifically Part 2.1, which lists policies relating to agriculture.

“Bidders must be able to demonstrate secure accommodation on the vineyard, in order to be able to provide appropriate oversight of the lease,” the tenders said.

Submissions must reach the Land Bank no later than Tuesday, November 29 at 10 a.m. Bids may be mailed to PO Box 2057, Edgartown, Massachusetts 02539, hand-delivered to 167 Main St. in Edgartown, or emailed to mhill@vineyardlandbank.com. for more information contact mhill@vineyardlandbank.com or 508-627-7141.

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Longview Vineyard’s beloved Heritage Barn gets a makeover • Glam Adelaide https://malcolmbluefarm.com/longview-vineyards-beloved-heritage-barn-gets-a-makeover-glam-adelaide/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 02:12:44 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/longview-vineyards-beloved-heritage-barn-gets-a-makeover-glam-adelaide/ To share Tweeter To share To share E-mail Featured image photo credit: Harry Vick Photography Since its inaugural vintage of 2001, Longview Vineyard has long been recognized as a premier destination in the Adelaide Hills with its luxury accommodation offerings and cellar door. Following its wins at the Australian Bridal Industry Awards, securing Best Ceremony […]]]>

Featured image photo credit: Harry Vick Photography

Since its inaugural vintage of 2001, Longview Vineyard has long been recognized as a premier destination in the Adelaide Hills with its luxury accommodation offerings and cellar door. Following its wins at the Australian Bridal Industry Awards, securing Best Ceremony Venue (2018) and Best Function Coordinator (2020), Longview is also becoming one of South Australia’s favorite winery wedding venues.

Taking their wedding offer one step further, the team at Longview have just completed a major renovation of the property’s heritage barn.

“The decision to renovate our heritage barn was important, as we didn’t want to lose the sense of rustic intimacy and history that our couples felt each time they entered the space. However, with COVID and a break in weddings, it was the perfect time to take this space to another level,” says Callie Smallwood, Events Manager.

“With new ironwork and flooring, the space has been given a refreshing and modern look while keeping heritage and history close. The extension to the front of the barn, which is made up of bays windows, offers a breathtaking view of our vineyard.

The barn’s origin story stretches back to the 1970s when the property initially operated as a dairy. The previous owners transformed the property into a venue for intimate dinners and lunches, building a kitchen where cows were once milked, before hosting Longview’s first wedding in 2006.

Since the Saturno family purchased the property in 2007, Longview Vineyard has been elevated to the wedding venue it is today, with significant kitchen upgrades, new flooring, a full paint job and a brand new equipment.

Heritage Barn hosted its first post-renovation wedding in August 2022 and can now accommodate up to 220 cocktail guests or 180 seated. Callie expects to see over 75 couples wed there by July next year.

“Longview wedding couples have been fortunate to use this stunning space since Longview’s very first wedding in 2006. Our recent 2022 renovation has increased capacity and added some modern touches to our barn, bringing a wider range of couples in Longview for their wedding,” Callie said.

“The beautiful Heritage Barn at Longview has a pitched roof, private bar, dance floor and log fire heater, plus a stunning glass front, offering views romantic on this Adelaide Hills vineyard.”

It is here that guests can sample estate wines and fresh seasonal dishes prepared by Longview’s chefs, led by the respected Alastair Raymond.

Alastair Raymond joined Longview Vineyard as Head Chef in 2018, after spending 2 years working as a chef at Hentley Farm. He spent time working overseas under Brett Graham in London at the 2 Michelin star Ledbury and 1 Michelin star Harwood Arms in 2012. He also interned at Noma, which at the time – and still recently – was voted the best restaurant in the world. .

If you would like to inquire about Longview’s wedding packages, contact Callie Smallwood via via [email protected] or at (08) 8388 9694.

Find Longview Vineyard at 154 Pound Rd, Macclesfield SA 5153.

Find out more at Longview Vineyard online, or on Facebook and Instagram.




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Revealing Exhibition – The Martha’s Vineyard Times https://malcolmbluefarm.com/revealing-exhibition-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 14:23:55 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/revealing-exhibition-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ History is usually written by those in power, and museum exhibits often focus on people at the top of the social pyramid with the ability to be masters of their own destiny. The Martha’s Vineyard Museum’s new exhibition, “Unfreedom: Enslavement, Indenture, and Incarceration on Martha’s Vineyard,” uses its time-traveling archive to explore those on the […]]]>

History is usually written by those in power, and museum exhibits often focus on people at the top of the social pyramid with the ability to be masters of their own destiny. The Martha’s Vineyard Museum’s new exhibition, “Unfreedom: Enslavement, Indenture, and Incarceration on Martha’s Vineyard,” uses its time-traveling archive to explore those on the other end of social strata – highlighting people who were not deeply free on the Island.

The show is beautiful, but the subject is in no way pretty. However, it is essential to see that the vineyard was not immune to these problems. The museum’s research librarian, Bow Van Riper, who assisted the exhibition’s guest curator, Dan Elias, explains the origins of the exhibition: “In the aftermath of the events of 2020, we were looking for ways to bring perspective Vineyard’s history to racism and inequality in America. The idea was to use ‘unfreedom’ to explore the experience of being victimized by a legal system that allows some individuals to have power over another. And in a broader sense, to understand what it was like to be a person on the vineyard without power, without autonomy, without the ability to shape your own life as you wish.

The first section is devoted to slavery. It is chilling to read an original bill of sale by 10-year-old boy Peter, sold by Zachheus Mayhew of Edgartown for £150, which spells out in black and white the nature of those who were enslaved for their lives – and that of their children, to infinity, to the owner and his subsequent heirs.

In a real estate inventory, it is sobering to see a human being listed as a “nigger boy” between the listing of a post and a horse. Elias says, “We recognize that these are really explosive documents and will be painful for a lot of people to watch. But it will be interesting to learn that slavery was alive and well in this colony at the beginning of the colonial period and until the Revolution.

Perhaps the most disturbing item is a ship’s manifesto from 1799, long after slavery was effectively outlawed in Massachusetts in 1783. We don’t just see the list of children, wives and men – including the death toll on the journey from Africa to Havana – but how each was sold in staggering numbers. The company responsible for hiring the ship and captain and arranging the sale in Havana was Fales and Athearn. Principal George Athearn was of the Vineyard and an important person as a member of the state legislature, judge, lawyer, and prominent landowner. This handwritten document reveals that even 15 years after slavery was no longer legal, Athearn was still making a lot of money in the slave trade, but not on American shores.

There are exhibits illustrating different forms of servitude, some voluntary, others more punitive and others judicial. Native Americans here on the Vineyard were not often enslaved like people of African descent were in most colonies, and later in early US history. they did not participate in writing, owning land and livestock, and borrowing money, which was basically a new concept to them. They would have financial problems, fines being imposed on them or having to repay loans. They would end up violating all these systems created by the white male power structure. Elias continues: “Because they would end up having to pay a fine or return the money, they would have to pay off the debt or the fine by being under contract – working for someone else with no money for a period of time. .” Usually there was a contract setting out the details, such as the engagement document for Wampanoag wife Beck Pocknossom, who owed Paine Mayhew 25 shillings. Because she could not pay the debt, Pocknossom was contracted to someone for four months, and the wages that would otherwise have been paid to her were paid to her creditor.

Another element reflects the commitment of apprentices. Before there was organized vocational education, if you wanted to be a weaver, sailor, carpenter or miller, you had to apprentice with a master. In the end, you left with knowledge of a trade and two suits, one for everyday and another for Sunday. Although the apprentice may have been willing, Elias says: “It’s striking when you see that they had to commit for seven, eight or nine years or more.”

A harsher form of enlistment was where poor children were taken – sometimes at a very young age, and often offered by their families – to be enlisted for a long period, usually until the age of 21, in as servants of a wealthier. family. This system worked in place of a social safety net. Ellis shares: “What is happening is that wealthy, white, privileged families on the island have found themselves with free labor for many years at the cost of food, housing and education for young people. in a precarious economic situation. Although not as scary as chattel slavery that was practiced before, the indenture continued into the early 20th century.

Elias also dissected information from the Edgartown Jail diaries covering the period from 1789 to 1862. This area of ​​the exhibit, which includes haunting leg chains, delineates the number of whites versus people of color for each reason for incarceration. Among the many telling statistics is that among the prisoners, a third were people of color, while their population on the island as a whole was only 12%.

Elias says he hopes it’s rewarding for people from other groups to see their potential ancestors being talked about on museum walls and to know that those stories are being told, honored and remembered. He concludes: “I really hope someone comes out with an idea of ​​what it might have been like on the streets in the past decade and the failures of the system to treat them like human beings.

“Unfreedom” can be viewed at Martha’s Vineyard Museum until February 12, 2023.

]]> Vinpro unveils e-learning platform for vineyard workers https://malcolmbluefarm.com/vinpro-unveils-e-learning-platform-for-vineyard-workers/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 05:00:58 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/vinpro-unveils-e-learning-platform-for-vineyard-workers/ For the first time, winegrowers can refine their skills online thanks to an e-learning platform dedicated to the wine industry. This was among comments shared with wine grape growers, winery representatives, winemakers and other interest groups at recent Vinpro and Winetech information days. Hosted at locations across the Olifants River, Paarl, Swartland, Worcester, Robertson and […]]]>

For the first time, winegrowers can refine their skills online thanks to an e-learning platform dedicated to the wine industry. This was among comments shared with wine grape growers, winery representatives, winemakers and other interest groups at recent Vinpro and Winetech information days.

Hosted at locations across the Olifants River, Paarl, Swartland, Worcester, Robertson and Breedekloof, attendees gained first-hand insight into the latest research and innovations in viticulture.

Kachné Ross, manager at Winetech Learning and Development. Photo: Supplied/Food for Mzansi

Commenting on the new training platform, Kachné Ross, Head of Winetech Learning and Development, says, “A teach-the-learner principle is followed whereby a person at the farm or institution receives training to facilitate the e-learning experience of his colleagues.

The platform is currently being deployed by industry body Winetech Learning and Development. The goal, says Ross, is to provide quality training to people across the wine industry value chain in a simple and accessible format.

Conrad Schutte, Head of Consulting Services at Vinpro, says: “It is important to continuously exchange knowledge across the industry so that we can continue to apply global standards in vineyard management, ensuring a more sustainable industry. sustainable and responsible. »

In addition to developments with the e-learning platform, Winetech and Vinpro also shared new techniques for monitoring soil and mealybug health, as well as irrigation scheduling, among other topics.

Irrigation and load shedding

Participants in Vinpro’s information days also discussed alternatives for load shedding at farm level following the continued power cuts at Eskom.

Ruan Gerber of Breërivier Irrigation says it’s important that existing irrigation systems work as efficiently as possible. It saves money, he says. “Discuss with your irrigation consultant savings and load shedding alternatives for your farm. This way you get advice tailored to your needs.

Jan Nortjé, the mastermind behind NOVAP subsurface irrigation, pointed out that this system has no water evaporation loss. “The NOVAP underground irrigation system offers up to 50% savings in irrigation water. There are several advantages to subsurface irrigation.

Meanwhile, Gert Engelbrecht, Vinpro wine consultant in the Olifants River region, urged attendees of Vinpro and Wintech info days to prioritize soil health.

“An important aspect of sustainable agriculture is to stop bad practices that harm soil health. Use existing beneficial winter weeds as cover crops if possible. Wild barley and creeping saline work well,” advised Engelbrecht.

He stressed that minimal cultivation, healthy and living roots, soil cover, crop rotation and integration of livestock were important.

ALSO READ: “The future of agriculture is already here”

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Visiting Vet: Sea Change – The Martha’s Vineyard Times https://malcolmbluefarm.com/visiting-vet-sea-change-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 15:53:08 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/visiting-vet-sea-change-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ On Thursday evening August 25, I received a call from Richard, my mother’s companion of 28 years. Both in their 90s, both live independently in the house where I grew up in Connecticut. Richard always drives, and most of the time he and my mom would go to Calf Pasture Beach and walk along the […]]]>

On Thursday evening August 25, I received a call from Richard, my mother’s companion of 28 years. Both in their 90s, both live independently in the house where I grew up in Connecticut. Richard always drives, and most of the time he and my mom would go to Calf Pasture Beach and walk along the shore. In recent years my mother, who is 97, has often chosen to wait in the car enjoying the view while Rich walks, but sometimes she will venture outside, take Richard’s arm and walk slowly with him. to the pier and back. But on Thursday night, everything changed. My mother fell down the stairs at home and was taken by ambulance to the hospital.

On Saturday morning, October 1, another big change happened here on the vineyard. For more than 20 years, Island veterinarians have had a coalition of volunteers who take turns providing after-hours and weekend emergency care to large and small animals. To clarify, in veterinary parlance, “large animal” refers to large farm animals. Horses, cows, sheep, goats, pigs, llamas, alpacas, maybe even emus and ostriches. “Small animal” means dogs and cats, as well as “pocket pets” such as guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits and rats. It can also include birds of all sizes, from cockatoos to canaries, and even reptiles like iguanas and geckos. But these days, “exotic” birds and pets are often the purview of vets who specialize in these critters. So what’s changing here, and what does it have to do with my mother?

When I got the phone call at 9 p.m., I was actually the vet on call. The last ferry, which was due to leave soon, was full and I don’t drive on the freeway after dark anyway. “Maybe she just has a bad bruise or a sprain,” I said optimistically. But reality slowly set in. I started packing my bags. Unable to sleep, I drove to Vineyard Haven before dawn and managed to get ferry availability at 5:30am. As I stood on the deck of the cargo ship watching the sun creep over the horizon, I suddenly remembered that I was still on watch. Well, morning emergencies are rare. I answered all phone calls and, if necessary, woke up the doctor who was to take over afterwards.

Twelve hours later, after much deliberation, including last-minute doubts from the surgeon about the risk-benefit ratio, my mother underwent partial hip replacement surgery. A hemi-arthroplasty, in ortho jargon. I will not explain to you the days that followed. Many of you have been there in one way or another, caring for a frail elderly parent, a seriously injured child, or a critically ill loved one. I quickly realized that, as difficult as it was for me to accept, my mother’s needs overshadowed those of my patients and their loved ones. I just couldn’t handle both at full capacity. I relied on telemedicine, my staff, and the kindness of other vets to care for my patients as I navigated a maze of decisions, emotions, and responsibilities for my mother. After three weeks, when I finally felt like I could risk leaving her temporarily, I drove home to work for a few days.

The night after I returned, one of my favorite dogs, a 13 year old epileptic springer spaniel I’ll call Whitecap, fell down the stairs. The poor boy was unable to stand. His right front paw was swollen and painful, and his back paws also appeared to be affected. He had sensations and movements in all limbs, indicating an intact spinal cord, but simply could not support his own weight. The parallels with my mother did not escape me. She couldn’t stand up. Her right arm had been inadvertently trapped under her body during surgery, causing a problem with her IV catheter, leaving her entire right forearm massively swollen and purple. Even his memory loss and post-anesthesia dementia looked like a neurological equivalent of Whitecap’s seizures.

Unlike my mother, Whitecap’s X-rays revealed no fractures. “Maybe he just twisted his back and sprained his front leg,” I said dubiously. Over the next two weeks, we tried splints, harnesses, and various painkillers. I’ve been back and forth in Connecticut, but I’ve stayed in touch. We tried doxycycline in case a tick-borne disease was involved. He still couldn’t get up. I suggested seeing an orthopedic specialist. I tentatively mentioned euthanasia. Finally, I shared the old vet adage, “No animal should die without the benefit of steroids,” and prescribed the powerful anti-inflammatory prednisone. Much to everyone’s delight, Whitecap responded well and was quickly able to get up and walk a bit on his own. My mother? I’m too superstitious to say much, but she also seems on the road to recovery. His downfall, however, precipitated a sea change that was about to happen anyway.

There is a national shortage of veterinarians. It is particularly serious here. A member of our group is taking a month off. Another stopped doing any emergency work. The harsh reality is that while our “urgent care” coalition continues, there may not always be an Island vet on call. So after hours, please start with a VetTriage telemedicine consultation via urgentvetcaremv.com. Their doctors will give medical advice and know if an island doctor is available if needed. What about those rare occasions when no local veterinarian is available, but VetTriage advises immediate care? For small animals, take the ferry (or call the Patriot Boat and then an Uber) and drive to Cape Cod Veterinary Specialists in Bourne. For large animals, call one of the mainland equine practices and follow their advice until a large animal vet on the island is available. We ask for your understanding. We’re getting old. Our numbers are shrinking. Maybe our parents are failing or our children need us. Maybe we are hoping to retire, or our own health is forcing us to slow down. We will continue to do our best for you and your animals, but I have to go call my mom now.

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Most Immigrants Didn’t Go to Martha’s Vineyard: What Our Schools Can Learn From This https://malcolmbluefarm.com/most-immigrants-didnt-go-to-marthas-vineyard-what-our-schools-can-learn-from-this/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/most-immigrants-didnt-go-to-marthas-vineyard-what-our-schools-can-learn-from-this/ Florida Governor Ron DeSantis made headlines last month when he shipped a handful of unsuspecting Venezuelan immigrants like cargo to Martha’s Vineyard. But the lessons that the young people of this country draw from this episode are entirely false. It is time for teachers, parents and our community of neighbors to change the way we […]]]>

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis made headlines last month when he shipped a handful of unsuspecting Venezuelan immigrants like cargo to Martha’s Vineyard. But the lessons that the young people of this country draw from this episode are entirely false. It is time for teachers, parents and our community of neighbors to change the way we talk about the cruel nature of politics and the inhumane treatment of immigrants in this country.

As usual, the news is conversation-driven on immigrants, not speaking with their. There are nearly half a million undocumented students in American schools today who listen intently to how teachers discuss economic, political, or moral arguments around immigration policies. More likely, however, these students – and their more than 75 million classmates – are learning the uncompromising lessons of silence, apathy, inaction and fear.

In a climate that makes it increasingly frightening and dangerous for teachers to discuss politics in their classrooms – not least because of the policies adopted by DeSantis and his allies – far too many of our students are learning that the arithmetic of drug trafficking human bodies from one part of a country to another has nothing to do with standards-aligned teaching in our classrooms, or that our national focus on “learning loss” leaves no time to talk about the lives put at risk by the anti-immigration stunts.

There are over 11 million people labeled as undocumented in this country, and the vast majority of them were not on one of DeSantis’ chartered planes or Texas Governor Greg Abbott’s buses in recent weeks. We may be out of sight and out of mind for most readers, but we were the undeclared essential workers in this country decades before such a term entered common parlance.

For a year, we have been studying how to understand and build a kind of critical empathy around the contexts of immigration, difference and change. Our research focused on narrative and personal experience. The show at Martha’s Vineyard, for example, is one of a series of cruel reminders of the lack of agency afforded to immigrants in this country. When it comes to lessons about immigration that students — and adults, for that matter — might learn, our schools have been resoundingly silent.

In mainstream education, immigration is largely the domain of history lessons, usually depicted as something that happened in the past or, more recently, as the flame under the multicultural melting pot that created this “nation of immigrants”. While schools generally teach immigration as a lesson in optimistic American progress, this by no means offers an accurate picture of the fractured state of debate and human angst experienced today.


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Schools need to expand where and how civic issues like immigration are discussed. As we have already said, all the teacher is a civics teacher, and the lessons of immigration must live on in all subjects. English teachers, for example, could relate the lessons here to related literature on contemporary immigration or conduct a student-led inquiry into the root causes of immigration. Perhaps a more cynical English teacher could offer a lesson in the irony behind DeSantis’ stunt: This summer has seen airports rumble with canceled flights and exorbitant airfares; the luxury of aircraft charter just for immigrants is a strange message from the Governor of Florida. Most undocumented immigrants cannot safely enter airports without fear of deportation. So while a few dozen crossed state lines at someone else’s expense, most would never attempt such a trip. There are many things this country takes away from its immigrants – adequate health care, security, family, a future – and the ability to travel safely by air when ticket prices are too high for s worrying about is pretty far down the list.

STEM teachers in general are often treated as if their work in the classroom has nothing to do with contemporary justice issues like immigration. But as our own research has explored, quantitative reasoning and understanding the civic dimensions of the world through data are essential to student learning. Immigration to have to be a topic covered in science and math classes.

While there are obviously developmental differences between age groups, immigration is a topic that can be explored at all grade levels. Young children from all walks of life know the sense of peril that comes with being dropped off in the morning, the fear of being left behind. Could this knowledge lead to moments of empathy and understanding for the kinds of voluntary and involuntary sacrifices that many individuals in this country must make in the name of family or survival?

In our ongoing research, a central problem we have identified – from personal experiences and curriculum analyzes – is that there are few examples of immigration-related teaching opportunities. in schools in general. Young immigrants may be teased or offered fewer educational opportunities because of language differences. Discussions of financial insecurity and legal insecurity can be treated as private sources of shame, even in the most progressive school districts. We don’t talk or teach enough about immigration because, as a country, we don’t know how.

The PR stunts of Ron DeSantis and Greg Abbott should remind us how little control immigrants have over their own lives. This is the lesson implicitly being taught in our schools right now.

Based on our own dialogue-focused research, this work begins with listening. Many of our classrooms are filled with young immigrants with an abundance of expertise that is not often allowed to surface. Teachers can let young people share what they know, what they have heard and what they wonder as a starting point for our collective learning. This is the moral and civic imperative of immigration and education in schools today.

The events of the past few weeks should remind us of how little control immigrants have over their own lives in this country. This is the lesson that is implicitly being taught in our schools right now. To be clear, it wasn’t just immigrants living in Republican-ruled states like Texas and Florida who watched this news with marked trepidation.

Here in California, where we live and work, violence against immigrants is common enough that it deserves only a passing mention in the news. From the scorching heat wave of early September that greatly overwhelmed farmworkers to the escalating violence local street vendors face daily, life for immigrants in supposedly liberal havens like California is anything but safe. .

It doesn’t take a Republican governor to remind us that immigrants get only temporary relief from the cruelty of America’s muddled policies. Our own field research and the work of scholars like Angela Garcia make it clear that undocumented immigrants face constant, barely visible danger. A traffic stop in the wrong municipality could turn life upside down and trigger the eviction process.

When will teachers and schools find the courage to discuss the fact that immigrants cannot reliably lead free, safe, and humane lives in the United States?

Democratic denunciations of DeSantis and Abbott’s actions have little impact on the daily experiences of these immigrants who did not find themselves on an unplanned flight to a resort island off the coast of Massachusetts. . For most of us, this entire episode was another reminder that our lives do not belong to us and that this country is more than happy to treat us like political pawns or cattle.

Read more

on America’s endless immigration battle

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10 of the best British wine tours https://malcolmbluefarm.com/10-of-the-best-british-wine-tours/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 09:23:29 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/10-of-the-best-british-wine-tours/ As the UK’s wine industry continues to go from strength to strength, here are 10 wineries to choose from for your next trip. 1) Flint Barns in Rathfinny, East Sussex Credit: Instagram/rathfinnyestate A stay in sunny Sussex is good under any circumstances, especially now that the county’s sparkling wines have PDO status. Located in the […]]]>

As the UK’s wine industry continues to go from strength to strength, here are 10 wineries to choose from for your next trip.

1) Flint Barns in Rathfinny, East Sussex

Credit: Instagram/rathfinnyestate

A stay in sunny Sussex is good under any circumstances, especially now that the county’s sparkling wines have PDO status. Located in the Cradle Valley, this picturesque retreat sits between the sea and the vineyard, the barns serving as a cozy escape with plenty of opportunities to sample chef Chris Bailey’s higher version of British cuisine with, of course, the premium sparkling wine from Sussex.

2) Glyndwr Vineyard, Glamorgan

Credit: Instagram/ glyndwrvineyard

Named after 15th century Welsh hero Owain Glyndwr, this charming spot in South Wales may well be where the last true Prince of Wales disappeared after his failed rebellion against the English crown, in particular given the tog rating of his pigtails, as he waits to get up yet. As for wines, for over 40 years Glyndwr Vineyard has been producing red, white, rosé and sparkling – there’s also vermouth from a collaboration with Gower Gin. And, as if the offer couldn’t be better, the estate even has llamas.

3) Ryedale Vineyards, Yorkshire

Credit: Instagram/ryedalevineyards

When you think of British wine regions, Yorkshire is often overlooked, but with its striking scenery and historic buildings, it’s certainly one of the most picturesque, and Ryedale Vineyards offers both. Stay in the Pheasant Room for £130 a night, or upgrade to the Fox Room for £150 and spend a night in the attic of a 500-year-old farmhouse. There is also the Hare twin room, to be shared with the Fox or Pheasant room. An additional payment of £15 per person entitles you to a tour of the five-hectare vineyard and a tasting of some of its wines, including Yorkshire’s Lass (a white) and Rosie (a rosé).

4) Tillingham, East Sussex

Best British Wine Breaks: Tillingham
Credit: Instagram/tillinghamwines

Although not exclusively a vineyard, with orchards, woods and livestock, it fits in with Tillingham’s polycultural approach and produces a range of natural wines. Accommodation options are varied, with the former hop farm offering 11 double rooms. From October until the end of the year there is also the Sunday Punch Down package, where customers will be greeted with a bottle of Tillingham sparkling col on arrival, then they can enjoy a four course menu with a matching wine flight and a Bloody Mary for breakfast.

5) Castlewood Vineyard, Devon

Nestled near Musbury Castle, a historic Iron Age fort that stretches the acceptable definition of ‘castle’ in this writer’s view, Castlewood Vineyard’s two listed 18th-century cottages, by contrast, are more than worthy of their reputation. For those who want something a little different, there’s the Bluebird Bus, a decommissioned 1970s Canadian school bus that’s been converted into cozy, retro accommodation – it even has a wood-burning stove (thankfully, the old fuel tank of the bus is empty). When you want to stock up on wines like Devon Minnow and Castlewood Vintage Brut, there’s always the cellar door.

6) Denbies Vineyard Hotel at Denbies Wine Estate, Surrey

Best British Wine Breaks: Denbies
Credit: Instagram/steviemannphotography

With over 100 hectares of vines, Denbies is one of the largest producers in the UK and has an equally impressive hotel. For £225 you and a guest can get a double room, a three course dinner and full English in the morning, there is also the option of afternoon tea and plenty of opportunities to sample Surrey Gold and the estate’s Sparkling Bacchus, among others. If you then feel an understandable need to burn off those meals, renting a bike, pilates or an intense session with Paul’s Absolute Fitness might be in order and luckily all are options for guests of the hotel.

7) Glamping in Secret Valley Vineyard, Somerset

Credit: Instagram/svglamping

Glamping is certainly a divisive style of accommodation – existing in this harsh outback between hotel and tent – but if that’s your kind of thing, then why not pair it with a night in the vineyards. Pinot Noir, Rondo, Orion, Solaris and Reichensteiner are all grown here (and wines available for purchase). Whether you spend the night in a wigwam, lodge or shepherd’s hut, enjoy the serenity of the Quantocks with local wine, and miniature alpacas and donkeys to sweeten the deal.

8) Sandridge Barton Estate, Devon

Credit: Instagram/stay_at_sandridge_barton

The home of Sharpham Wine is also home to a variety of places to stay. Choose from a six-bedroom Georgian house, the Boathouse (also built during the Georgian period) which is perched on the bank of the River Dart, or, for easy winery access, the Lower Well Farmhouse. The restaurant alone is worth the detour: small local producers are favored, the chefs even making their own charcuterie and vinegar. Of course, Sharpham Wine is the perfect accompaniment to the menu.

9) The Goudhurst Inn by Balfour Wine Estate, Kent

Best Winery Stays in the UK - The Goudhurst Inn
Credit: Instagram/thegoudhurstinn

After sampling hearty (but fine) pub fare with Balfour wines or local ale, settle in for a night in one of the boutique hotel rooms, from just £109. Then head to the winery, just a 10-minute taxi ride through the Kent countryside, for a full estate tour and tasting costing £45 weekdays or £65 weekends, or, once a month , immerse yourself in an art and wine evening, then return to the Goudhurst Inn for a nightcap.

10) Valley Farm Vineyards, Suffolk

Credit: Instagram/valleyfarmvineyards

For when you want a grape getaway, there’s always a cabin among the vines of Madeleine Angevine and Suffolk Pinot Gris. Founded in 1987, current caretaker Adrian Cox has owned the site since last year after deciding he wanted to move away from construction and focus on growing vines. While the cabin may seem rustic, its combination of old and new technologies, with sheep’s wool insulation and solar-powered energy, make it an ideal retreat for simple, low-carbon comfort.

If you want to visit somewhere a little further from home, check out 10 of the best wine tours around the world.

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DeSantis Abbott Migrants Martha’s Vineyard NYC https://malcolmbluefarm.com/desantis-abbott-migrants-marthas-vineyard-nyc/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 13:26:34 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/desantis-abbott-migrants-marthas-vineyard-nyc/ Andrew P. Napolitano Seeing the unprecedented forced deportations of immigrants from Texas to New York, Martha’s Vineyard and the District of Columbia, I thought my grandparents were lucky to have entered the United States at one time, although only xenophobic towards those in Southern Europe, who do not condone the use of government assets to […]]]>

Andrew P. Napolitano

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Florida Governor DeSantis sends immigrants to Martha’s Vineyard https://malcolmbluefarm.com/florida-governor-desantis-sends-immigrants-to-marthas-vineyard/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:17:57 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/florida-governor-desantis-sends-immigrants-to-marthas-vineyard/ The governor shows his arrogance I must say that Mr. DeSantis has outdone himself this time around. Sending immigrants, illegal or otherwise, to a sanctuary city proved which governor? That you and Greg Abbott from Texas think treating human beings as commodities and shipping them to another city/state accomplishes anything? What you have done is […]]]>
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Martha’s Vineyard and the Fraud of the Rich White Liberal https://malcolmbluefarm.com/marthas-vineyard-and-the-fraud-of-the-rich-white-liberal/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/marthas-vineyard-and-the-fraud-of-the-rich-white-liberal/ “We spoke to a number of people who asked, ‘Where am I?’ And then I was trying to explain where Martha’s Vineyard is,” said confused Edgartown, Massachusetts, Police Chief Bruce McNamee of the 50 illegal immigrants who landed on two charter flights at the island’s only airport on Wednesday. According to local reports, airport officials […]]]>

“We spoke to a number of people who asked, ‘Where am I?’ And then I was trying to explain where Martha’s Vineyard is,” said confused Edgartown, Massachusetts, Police Chief Bruce McNamee of the 50 illegal immigrants who landed on two charter flights at the island’s only airport on Wednesday.

According to local reports, airport officials believed the planes were carrying businessmen on an end-of-season golf retreat, only to be met with crushing disappointment that arriving passengers were, in fact, , poor colored people.

The illegals arrived courtesy of Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, who sent them there using a $12 million budget set aside by our Free State Legislature to transport the illegals to jurisdictions shrines. He joins the governors of Texas and Arizona, who have bused thousands of illegals into New York, Washington and Chicago to protest the Biden administration’s catastrophic failure to secure our southern border.

According to a DeSantis spokesperson, “States like Massachusetts, New York, and California will make it easier to accommodate these people they have invited into our country by encouraging illegal immigration.” “What would be best,” DeSantis himself said at a press conference, “would be for Biden to do his fucking job and secure the border.”

In the current fiscal year, immigration authorities detained nearly two million people who crossed the border illegally. The number of those who were not apprehended is unknown, but very few were likely bound for Martha’s Vineyard, which Virtue flagged itself as a “sanctuary destination”. Its largely seasonal population likely believed it would never have to host anyone other than affluent white liberals and the Obamas, who own an $11.75 million 29-acre property on the island.

These white liberals are now entertaining the world with the funniest mass meltdown in quite some time. As natural hypocrites whose commitment to diversity ends where their cobblestone paths begin, they don’t like the idea of ​​new vineyard residents any more than Democratic mayors like New York’s Eric Adams and Muriel Bowser from Washington, DC don’t appreciate their migrants. The two mayors declared a state of emergency after the arrival of only a small fraction of the illegal immigrants whom their counterparts on the Texas and Arizona borders must address daily.

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren chastised that sending the illegals was “repugnant and cruel”. Recumbent and penitent, former Republican columnist Max Boot of the Washington Post denounced DeSantis’ “callousness and cynicism” and warned that his future presidency would be “dangerous”.

DeSantis’ campaign opponent Charlie Crist, who trails him by eight points and likely regrets that illegals weren’t in Florida to vote for him in November, called the move “disgusting and vile.” He suggested that DeSantis is “not in control of his faculties,” hilariously from an unprincipled man who managed to run for state office as a Democrat, Republican and Independent and lose in all three forms.

Self-proclaimed “experts” have accused the Florida governor of human trafficking. White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre hysterically declared that the illegals “deserve better than…to be left at Martha’s Vineyard.” Hit? In an interview with CNN the day after the illegals arrived, biased journalist John Berman and documentary filmmaker Ken Burns – a former guest at the island’s Boring Film Festival – compared free flights to the Holocaust .

Furious liberals, however, are reluctant to admit exactly where the illegals ended up. It’s understandable given that their idyllic island, where Biden won 77.6% of the vote, is far beyond the means of nearly all of their fellow Americans, ‘deplorables’ they would also rather not see or be around. . Martha’s Vineyard has a median sale price of $1.35 million.

MSNBC commentator Chris Hayes, who hosted book signings at the vineyard, found it “deeply dehumanizing to throw human beings somewhere vindictively”. Somewhere? Could spelling out the “where” cast doubt on the sincerity of his beliefs? And if he really believes in sanctuary destinations, how is sending migrants to a particularly pleasant destination for free an act of revenge?

Warren, meanwhile, promised to “continue to work with local, state and federal partners to ensure we have the resources to care for people with dignity,” again without saying where those deserving people are. and how awkward they could be close to the holidays. the homes of those who were “everything to Warren”. Yet it was Massachusetts State Senator Dylan Fernandes who threw up perhaps the most colorful word salad. He exposed DeSantis’ “secret plot to send immigrant families like cattle on a plane…to a place they didn’t know where they were going.” [sic]. Would his outrage convince anyone if he named the luxurious place where the illegals met? When cows fly!

The outside world on left-Twitter, however, knows that illegals were lucky enough to land in one of America’s wealthiest communities after violating our country’s laws by illegally crossing its borders. Now that the Vineyard Liberals must endure their sight on their doorsteps, they and their Confederates can only fall into a narcissistic rage. Their superficial and pretentious commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion and open borders is exposed as a shameless fraud. It is, after all, the same reaction – perhaps from some of the same people – whose caviar liberalism turned into scurrilous opposition when Adams’ failed predecessor Bill DeBlasio moved dozens charming homeless men in empty Upper West Side hotels.

Vineyard residents say they responded with “compassion” – so much compassion they provided basic support for less than 24 hours before begging on the internet for donations from even guiltier white liberals. That’s more than a little rich, so to speak, on an island where about 63% of million-dollar homes are vacant outside of the summer months. But that didn’t occur to Lisa Belcastro, coordinator of the island’s homeless shelter, who told local media that “at some point [the illegals] you have to move elsewhere. … We don’t have accommodation for 50 more people. It’s doubtful, but even if the summer residents don’t want to open their doors or their wallets, the Vineyard nobles surely wouldn’t mind if the four children in the group would have made generous use of their many swimming pools. What could be more compassionate? What could be more inclusive?

“We love you,” Warren’s Senate colleague Ed Markey tweeted from the comfortable retreat from his Capitol Hill office. If Markey is honest, DeSantis should charter the entire Cape Air fleet and send hourly flights carrying more new Massachusetts residents to enjoy the sunsets from the East Chop Lighthouse. No doubt Markey will be there, making sandwiches and telling them how to vote in their new country.

Paul du Quenoy is president of the Palm Beach Freedom Institute.

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