Vineyard – Malcolm Blue Farm http://malcolmbluefarm.com/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 10:24:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-14.png Vineyard – Malcolm Blue Farm http://malcolmbluefarm.com/ 32 32 What goes into a GOOD turkey? https://malcolmbluefarm.com/what-goes-into-a-good-turkey/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 21:34:39 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/what-goes-into-a-good-turkey/ As the days grow shorter and leaves begin to accumulate (a bit massively) on the island’s lawns, people are settling deeper into the offseason and preparing for what often turns out to be a rather hectic but special time of year. It’s a time when families come together to celebrate, thank, and eat an often […]]]>

As the days grow shorter and leaves begin to accumulate (a bit massively) on the island’s lawns, people are settling deeper into the offseason and preparing for what often turns out to be a rather hectic but special time of year.

It’s a time when families come together to celebrate, thank, and eat an often inordinate amount of food – in my case, that’s a joke.

Thanksgiving is almost here, and while many may have already lowered their holiday bird to Stop & Shop, or one of the caring food donation organizations on the island, there are local options for little. nearly all the pitfalls you could imagine on your board this year.

The highlight of any Thanksgiving holiday is traditionally the turkey (vegan or vegetarian households can refrain from this tradition). Some go for the giant birds, while others prefer a more manageable portion without the need to consolidate leftovers.

Aside from the recipe you use to cook your turkey – of which there are many – the most essential element that determines a perfect bird for Thanksgiving is the quality of the bird.

For Jefferson Monroe, owner of GOOD Farm and co-owner of Larder in Tisbury, responsibly raising livestock is a dominant aspect of his practice. Because he wants to be able to feel good about the food he offers families and make sure the food is of the highest quality possible, Monroe uses a system called biomimicry.

“This is basically where you watch how an animal or plant grows and behaves, and mimic aspects of that behavior in a way that is beneficial both to the plant or animal, and to whoever does it. push or pupil, ”Monroe told The Times during a visit to Thimble Farm.

In Thimble, Monroe raises around 85 broad-breasted white turkeys and prepares them for processing shortly before Thanksgiving.

Turkeys roam a fenced area, have access to grass and insects, and are fed at regular intervals. “They’re allowed to do things that a turkey likes to do, but we control where they are all the time,” Monroe said. “By the time the turkeys are about a week before we process them for Thanksgiving, they have access to that quarter or eighth of an acre that they can graze and walk around. But when we bring them in initially, we start them in an incubator and a covered pen that we move every day.

This is a mutual benefit for the staff of Island Grown Initiative, which owns and operates Thimble Farm, as turkey waste is a natural nitrogen-rich fertilizer, and the bird’s grazing “pulses” the grass, said Monroe. , and allows the grass to die off and nourish the soil.

While the methods GOOD Farm uses are relatively conventional compared to many other small livestock farms, the process looks completely different from how large factory farms send turkeys en masse to grocery stores across the country.

According to Monroe, most turkeys available in grocery stores are raised in California, as it is the largest turkey-producing state in America. “Most turkeys are raised in what looks like giant airplane hangars – those sprawling spaces where they’re allowed to run around for a bit, but the density is pretty high and they never see a grain of grass,” he said. Monroe said. He added that if a turkey gets sick in a large chicken coop, it is easy for the infection to spread among the population.

Turkeys raised by Monroe are exposed to the elements, which can affect size and growth rate, as they use more energy to regulate body temperature. In addition, turkeys reared outside 24-hour chicken coops cannot eat through the night, so their growth is limited. “All of these things combine to reduce how quickly they hit the market, but having a more varied diet in terms of birds eating grass and bugs, it adds a ton of flavor to them,” Monroe said. .

He noted that the temperature variations during the day and at night outdoors mean that the birds tend to take on more fat, which also provides flavor.

Currently, all of Monroe’s turkeys at Thimble Farm are booked, which he says tends to happen quickly around Thanksgiving. “It’s a shame people don’t tend to eat turkey until around Thanksgiving because they’re delicious and they’re really fun to raise,” Monroe said.

On the Friday leading up to Turkey Day, all birds will be processed and organized based on who wants what size. “Basically a lot of organizations have those 20 to 30 pound soccer balls – we always explain to people that there can be variations in size,” Monroe said.

At the heart of his love for farming, Monroe said, is the goal of leading an ethical life and being proud of the food he produces. “The things you eat have a huge impact on the world at large. It’s really terrible when animals are treated like machines, so we avoid that, ”said Monroe. “I really enjoy spending time providing healthy, local food for people, but also being a role model to show others how to do the same. “

Monroe has cooked turkeys in different ways for Thanksgiving – roasts, fries, shawarma – just about anything you can think of. “If I’ve learned anything, it’s that roasting a whole turkey is doomed – big thighs want to cook longer, while breast meat dries up,” he said.

Here are two recipes for two different parts of the turkey that Monroe enjoys.

Turkey thighs with dried cherries

2 tbsp. oil

2 turkey thighs (ask your butcher to remove from your bird if you are uncomfortable)

3 onions, roughly chopped

2 cups of dried cherries

2 tbsp. chopped sage

1 tbsp. fresh ginger, minced

1 cup of dry white wine (or dry vermouth)

The day before, generously season the turkey thighs with salt. The same day, heat the oil in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat until it sparkles, and brown the turkey thighs on all sides. Remove the thighs and cook the onions until golden brown, deglaze with a little wine if necessary. Next, place the turkey thighs in the onions and add the cherries, sage, ginger, and white wine, along with enough water to cover most of the thighs. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to low and cover. Turn the legs every 45 minutes to an hour, and after the first hour, season the liquid to your liking. After about three hours, the meat on the thighs should peel off. I like to turn off the heat at this point and let it melt, after another seasoning check. You can shred the turkey and use the whole thing as a gravy substitute, or slice it up and serve with the cherries and onions around.

Roasted Turkey Breast

Turkey, legs removed

Cooking oil, olive oil or butter

Salt water (see below)

On Monday, place the legless turkey in a brine bag and cover with the brine. If you don’t have room in your fridge, buy a small cooler and place ice around your brine bag. Make sure to secure the top so you don’t feed the raccoons on the island.

On Tuesday, check that you still have ice on your bird and that raccoons are kept away.

On Wednesday, drain the turkey and keep it uncovered in your refrigerator. This will help the skin to dry out so that it becomes crispy.

On Thanksgiving, preheat your oven to 300 °. Place the turkey in a roasting pan and roast, breast side up, basting with pan juices or rubbing with olive oil or butter every 30 minutes. I usually do the 20 minute per pound estimate and start checking with a meat thermometer about an hour and a half before the scheduled time. When you measure the thickest part (don’t reuse the same measuring hole!) At 15 minutes, until the bird reaches the golden shade you are looking for. Let the bird sit for more than 20 minutes and cut it up for the table.

Turkey brine

Place the turkey in a bag of brine and measure out the amount of liquid needed to cover the turkey. Drain and discard the liquid; this is the amount of brine you will need for your turkey. Here’s the ratio: multiply by the number of gallons of brine you’ll need for your turkey.

12 cups of ice water, plus 3 cups of water

1 cup of apple cider

1 cup of salt

sprig of sage

sprig of thyme

sprig of rosemary

1 tbsp. peppers

Bring three cups of water, apple cider, salt, sage, thyme, rosemary and peppercorns to a boil. Stir to dissolve the salt and let cool to room temperature. Combine with the rest of the ice water, stir to combine well and pour over the turkey. This is for 1 gallon of brine – multiply by the number of gallons you need to cover your turkey.


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Resonant technology, created to combat the effects of climate change in the vineyard, is launched at the Glasgow Sustainability Innovation Forum https://malcolmbluefarm.com/resonant-technology-created-to-combat-the-effects-of-climate-change-in-the-vineyard-is-launched-at-the-glasgow-sustainability-innovation-forum/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/resonant-technology-created-to-combat-the-effects-of-climate-change-in-the-vineyard-is-launched-at-the-glasgow-sustainability-innovation-forum/ New Agricultural Technology Company Offers Innovative Products That Have Been Proven To Improve Vine Health And Yields In The Face Of Drought, Extreme Heat And Other Climatic Events NEW YORK, November 9, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Today at the Sustainability Innovation Forum in Glasgow, Founder Marco poggianella and CEO Marc Fleishhacker announced the launch […]]]>

New Agricultural Technology Company Offers Innovative Products That Have Been Proven To Improve Vine Health And Yields In The Face Of Drought, Extreme Heat And Other Climatic Events

NEW YORK, November 9, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Today at the Sustainability Innovation Forum in Glasgow, Founder Marco poggianella and CEO Marc Fleishhacker announced the launch of their new company, Resonant Technology. “Resonant technology provides proprietary, real-world tested agricultural technology to help winegrowers and farmers combat the effects of climate change,” said Marco Poggianella. “Our products help vines withstand the effects of drought, intense heat and other extreme weather events, thereby improving yields and grape quality,” added Marc Fleishhacker. “Our technology has been tested for many years by the largest wine companies and winegrowers in Italy and California, and they’ve proven to be incredibly effective. »The new company is headquartered in United States with R&D offices in Italy.

Resonant Technology’s new wine product offering is launched with five core products: Fortify Red ©, Fortify White ©, Fortify Sparkling ©, Encore © (used to invigorate vines after harvest before they go into dormancy) and Rescue © ( used for vines following extreme weather events from frost and hailstorms to extreme heat peaks). The vine products are all powered by the exclusive SOP INSIDE technology, developed by Marco Poggianella and his team of scientists over 7 years of intensive research, field trials and industrial pilots.

“I first came into contact with SOP Inside technology products seven years ago and have seen dramatic and continuous improvements in the health and resilience of vineyards in California to the width of Italy wine regions ”, declared Martine Broggio, – Agronomist and Oenologist – Veneto Italy. “With this proven technology, wineries are able to produce better grapes and make better wines and they feel more optimistic for the future despite the severity and increasing number of extreme weather events they experience each time. year. “

Marco Poggianella, a trained physicist, has been described as “a true eco-designer”. He speaks at global conferences on sustainable agriculture and other climate issues and is the author of numerous scientific articles on the topic of climate change on farms. Marc Fleishhacker is a native of the San Francisco Bay Area who divides his time as CEO of Resonant between the United States and Italy. Marc, whose first job after graduating from Brown University was as a sommelier, has held executive positions in technology and marketing companies, holding executive positions for large corporations as well as start-ups. entrepreneurial ups.

About resonant technology
Developed after years of intensive research, the agricultural products of Resonant Technology (http://www.ResonantTechnology.com), powered by SOP Inside Technology, have proven remarkably effective in tackling the effects of climate change on vines, many crops and livestock – lasting solutions to increasingly intractable problems. Resonant technology, fully organic products, maximizes the strength of what surrounds us naturally: the microbiome. Resonant Technology’s grapevine products strengthen the soil-plant relationship and the ecosystem, thereby enhancing the transfer of nutrients to the grapevine roots, enhancing grape growth, resilience and grape quality.

About Colangelo & Partners
Colangelo & Partners (http://www.colangelopr.com) is the first integrated wine and spirits communication agency in United States, sought after by the biggest brands and industry players for the quality of their results, their creativity and their return on investment. Colangelo & Partners professionals work with integrity and passion to influence how the American public perceives their clients: Gain consistent, high-quality, positive media coverage; organization of signature events; strategize and execute remarkable digital campaigns; and the implementation of business programs that strengthen relationships within the industry. Colangelo & Partners’ clientele includes immediately recognizable global brands and passionate and promising winemakers and distillers; regional and national institutions; and innovative technology and e-commerce companies in the alcoholic beverage sector.

Media contact

Irene Graziotto, Colangelo & Partners, +1 646 624-2885, igraziotto@colangelopr.com

SOURCE resonance technology


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West Tisbury considers new regulations on burying cattle https://malcolmbluefarm.com/west-tisbury-considers-new-regulations-on-burying-cattle/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 15:59:30 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/west-tisbury-considers-new-regulations-on-burying-cattle/ West Tisbury is considering new regulations on the burial of cattle for reasons of public health and environmental protection. – Eunki Seonwoo West Tisbury Board of Health began discussions on the potential implementation of new cattle burial regulations at a Zoom meeting on Thursday. West Tisbury health worker Omar Johson said the proposed regulations were […]]]>

West Tisbury is considering new regulations on the burial of cattle for reasons of public health and environmental protection. – Eunki Seonwoo

West Tisbury Board of Health began discussions on the potential implementation of new cattle burial regulations at a Zoom meeting on Thursday.

West Tisbury health worker Omar Johson said the proposed regulations were “taken directly” from the University of Massachusetts Amherst extension. best practices in livestock disposal. Best Practices identify methods of burying livestock that prevent disease from spreading to humans and animals from the carcass, and prevent pollution of air, soil and groundwater.

Johnson and West Tisbury Conservation President Maria McFarlands said they couldn’t find other towns in Massachusetts with this type of cattle burial regulations.

“I’m in favor of doing this,” said Jessica Miller, board member of health. However, Miller said the board should check with lawyers to see if they would have the authority to enforce this new rule if implemented.

“I will not pass it at all until we remove some regulations from the board,” West Tisbury Board of Health Chairman Tim Barnett said. “We have enough rules like that. I don’t want to pile up anymore. I fundamentally agree with that, but there are too many regulations, misconceptions and misuse of the rules. I don’t want that anymore.

Barnett said he was particularly concerned about animal health in general. He had recently received a complaint about the attitude of the person performing the chicken inspections, which are carried out by Johnson and animal control officer Anthony Cordray.

Johnson said he was very careful with the way he treated people and hadn’t received a lot of complaints. Johnson said the complaint was a personnel issue rather than a regulatory issue.

“A lot of regulations are in place for reasons, necessary reasons,” Johnson said. “I will honor your request not to pass it until we have further discussed our current regulations, of which there are many. “


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Good brewing with Bad Martha https://malcolmbluefarm.com/good-brewing-with-bad-martha/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 15:27:47 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/good-brewing-with-bad-martha/ The fun fall flavors have arrived at Bad Martha Brewing Co., and guess who learned how they’re made? Yes, you guessed it – me. Once again, I got to do something pretty cool for the “Teach Me” series. Hanging out on the vineyard taught me a lot, but there was a pretty big gap in […]]]>

The fun fall flavors have arrived at Bad Martha Brewing Co., and guess who learned how they’re made? Yes, you guessed it – me. Once again, I got to do something pretty cool for the “Teach Me” series. Hanging out on the vineyard taught me a lot, but there was a pretty big gap in my knowledge: beer.

I was able to connect with the folks at Bad Martha to take an afternoon and learn how the brewing process goes.

The brewing process begins with the grinding of your malt. Barley is one of the most commonly used in craft breweries, but wheat and rye are also common. The malt is crushed in the mill, then mixed with very hot water to begin brewing. This brewing operation is done inside the aptly named mash tun, a fairly large container.

Brewing creates a sweet extract called wort, which is drained into the kettle to be boiled. The surplus of spent grain goes to local farmers to feed the livestock.

Then boiling begins. The boiling of the wort is responsible for pasteurization, and this is when the hops are added.

Hops added earlier will boil longer and increase bitterness, while hops added later and boiled for less time will make beer less bitter. Boiling is also the stage where other flavors can be added, such as blueberry, honey and others.

My favorite part of this whole process was most definitely the mashing and boiling as it adds a sweet baked aroma to the whole room. Plus, the Bad Martha team were super cool and let me get on the mash tun to mix the concoction, which made me feel like making a bowl of oatmeal for a giant.

I remembered my days as a baker, where you could taste sugar in the air of the bakery, kind of like that sugar storm scene in “Gone Girl” where the character of Rosamund Pike tells about the times. where the character of Ben Affleck made his date behind a bakery where sugar was delivered and kissed him. (Affleck’s character ended up paying a lot for it because, well, you should just watch the movie.)

The next step is fermentation. The wort is cooled so that the yeast can be added. Since yeast is alive, the temperature it lives in is a bit picky. (Why do we New English people suffer from such long winters?) With the yeast in the cooled wort, brewers wait a few days to let things ferment. The yeast consumes the sugar from the brewing process and turns it into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Bad Martha offers two types of brewing yeast: brewer’s yeast for the fruity flavors and lager yeast for a cleaner, less complex beer. Then comes the conditioning, so the beer can mellow.

The last step is to take a glass and pour a large one from the tap, or open a bottle and drink.

This reporter got to try his hand at making Mischievous Mermaid IPA, a New England-style 7.7% ABV IPA, earlier in the summer. It is described as a hazy and medium mouth feel, filled with a great flavor of tropical and juicy aroma. You’re in luck too, because it’s available at the brewery.

Fun fall flavors on the deck are Oktoberfest Märzen and Pumpkin Ale.

Oktoberfest is 6.1% ABV and is a management favorite. “Personally it’s just one of my favorites for the season. It’s what I always drink after work now, ”said Chief Brewer Bryan Link. “For Oktoberfest, it’s a traditional German-style lager, so it’s a bit malty with a nice hop bitterness, and a bit of aroma to back it up… It’s a really well balanced beer.”

Pumpkin Ale is a 6% ABV made from cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, vanilla and pumpkin. When Pumpkin Beer begins brewing on the island, Bad Martha’s will be using pumpkins from Morning Glory Farm. The brewing process differs slightly for pumpkin beer. “For the pumpkin beer, we add the pumpkins to our mash, and that makes a much thicker mash,” Link said.

Link is joined by Cal Scarfone in Edgartown and Cam Carter in Falmouth to create the delicious seasonal beers. Both beers are available at both Bad Martha’s establishments, ready to serve.

Bad Martha has other beers in her repertoire such as the Coffee Porter, made with Chilmark coffee; Beach Plum Dubbel, aged with island beach plums collected by the FARM Institute; and the Oyster Stout, made with local Cottage City oysters.

Bad Martha Brewery, 270 Upper Main Street, Edgartown. Open until October and for Christmas in Edgartown. 508-939-4415; badmarthabeer.com/brasserie.


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Wild side: farms as habitat https://malcolmbluefarm.com/wild-side-farms-as-habitat/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 13:37:23 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/wild-side-farms-as-habitat/ In addition to pecking Wild Side columns for the MV Times, my professional life includes roles with BiodiversityWorks and the Betsy and Jesse Fink Family Foundation. Both entities share my interest in sustainability and biodiversity conservation. So it’s no surprise that I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how food production (I mean, for food […]]]>

In addition to pecking Wild Side columns for the MV Times, my professional life includes roles with BiodiversityWorks and the Betsy and Jesse Fink Family Foundation. Both entities share my interest in sustainability and biodiversity conservation. So it’s no surprise that I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how food production (I mean, for food humans) intersects with ecological health.

A farm, after all, is nothing more than a specialized habitat. Depending on the nature of the operation, the focus may be on optimizing conditions for livestock, row crops or cereals. But the same ecological principles that apply in wild areas apply just as well to farms. Populations, whether cultivated plants or wildflowers, reflect the balance of recruitment and mortality; each species has certain ecological requirements that must be met if that species is to thrive. A good farmer is a good environmentalist.

And like any other habitat, a farm interacts with the different habitats that surround it. Plants and animals move easily to a farm from outside or from the farm to neighboring environments. There is no such thing as a totally closed ecosystem, unless you want to take the example of the entire planet Earth.

More than most habitats, farms are characterized by a deliberately intensified biology. Huge amounts of biomass are produced over the course of a year; large amounts of chemicals, ranging from nutrients and minerals to carbon dioxide and water, travel from the environment to and out of living tissue. Wildlife of all kinds are noticing this storm of productivity. Crops or cover crops, when in bloom, attract bees, wasps, flies and pollinators of all kinds to exploit pollen and nectar. In turn, these insects ensure productivity by pollinating fruits and vegetables.

Even the waste or excess productivity of a farm is useful for wildlife. There is nothing, for example, that a migrating sparrow likes better than a field of exhausted, slightly frosted tomatoes, full of seeds, rotten fruit and late-season insects. Of course, sparrows successfully migrated before there were farms, and they still can. But the number of sparrows (and, for that matter, late migrants like palms and yellow-rumped warblers) that I have encountered in farm fields in late fall convinces me that the birds themselves have identified this resource as particularly attractive.

Pastures support the nesting of killdeers and savanna sparrows; in winter, farmland is favored by birds such as snow buntings, pipits and larks in winter, while in the warmer months insectivorous birds of all kinds converge on farms to feed on the richness of invertebrates.

Of course, there are limits to the ecological merits of farms. In general, you will not find wildlife with very specific habitat requirements or ecological associations; agricultural land is the home of generalist species, plants and animals adapted to a wide range of conditions and to the use of a variety of resources. If a bee species has evolved to forage primarily for, say, blueberries, you are unlikely to find that bee on a farm unless blueberries are among the crops grown. (For some insects, however, such as squash bees, farms are the preferred habitat.)

And there are negative impacts to consider. Farms occupy an area that was once natural habitat, and they are generally dominated by non-native species – not just the crops themselves, but the agricultural weeds that have come to North America as unwanted guests as well. than more desirable Old World crop species. Weed populations on farms represent source populations that can spread to surrounding areas. In addition, anything a farmer does to increase crop production or limit pests can spill over into the environment; depending on the nature of the farm, pesticide drift, nutrient runoff or the flow of pathogenic bacteria into surrounding waters can pose major threats to the regional ecology.

Modern methods of food production have focused, rather frighteningly, on increasing the scale and simplifying the ecology of farms. The goal of roundup-ready cultivars is, quite explicitly, a vast area over which nothing but cultivated species can survive. The farm is still an ecological system; it’s just a depopulated, really boring one that offers nothing to the surrounding landscape. I’m glad to see, in places like Martha’s Vineyard, a counter-movement gaining strength. Small farmers here and elsewhere embrace the ecological relationships that a farm can be a part of, rather than fighting against them.

Organic farming, regenerative farming and restorative farming are three interrelated and somewhat slippery terms that describe this holistic notion of food production. Farmers can consciously mitigate or simply avoid potentially dangerous practices. They can learn to trust the services, such as pollination and pest control, provided by bees and natural predators. They can accumulate the soil rather than depleting it and then depending on fertilizers. They may even take action aimed solely at promoting biodiversity, confident in the idea that a healthy and resilient ecosystem is a rising tide that lifts all boats.

Farms will never be the complete solution to declining biodiversity. But they shouldn’t be part of the problem.


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MV CROP Hunger Walk ends with a celebration https://malcolmbluefarm.com/mv-crop-hunger-walk-ends-with-a-celebration/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 18:42:17 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/mv-crop-hunger-walk-ends-with-a-celebration/ A small, enthusiastic crowd gathered on Sunday to celebrate the accomplishments of the Martha’s Vineyard CROP Hunger March, which brought together participants from various religious organizations on the island. People were swinging and chatting as the Convertibles, a Vineyard-based jazz band, played. Drivers also showed up in cars and honked their horns in support. The […]]]>

A small, enthusiastic crowd gathered on Sunday to celebrate the accomplishments of the Martha’s Vineyard CROP Hunger March, which brought together participants from various religious organizations on the island. People were swinging and chatting as the Convertibles, a Vineyard-based jazz band, played. Drivers also showed up in cars and honked their horns in support.

The 31st Martha’s Vineyard CROP Hunger Walk closing ceremony was held at St. Augustine’s Church in Vineyard Haven. Woody Bowman, one of the organizers of the CROP Walk, led the event.

Under normal circumstances, a group would meet at church to travel to the Oak Bluffs Campground and return, according to organizer Majorie Peirce. However, to protect people from COVID-19, the organizers decided on a smaller-scale rally at the church.

Walkers did their fundraising individually or in small teams of friends and family this year. This was also in an effort to protect participants from COVID, and this is how the march went in 2020. Of the money raised, 25% of the funds will be donated to Island Food Pantry and the Vineyard Committee on Hunger. The remainder of the money will be donated to Church World Services, a nonprofit, multi-faith Christian organization, and used “in the United States and around the world for emergency food supplies, agricultural training, livestock, wells and pumps, farm seeds and farm equipment, ”according to Martha’s Vineyard CROP Hunger Walk page.

Through the online campaign, $ 16,254.79 has been raised so far. In-person donations still need to be counted. Donations will continue to be collected until October 30.

“These marches made a difference,” Bowman said. He expects more donations to arrive in the remaining two weeks.

“Last year… we raised maybe half the money after the celebration,” said Peirce. In 2020, a record amount of $ 37,772 was raised to help fight hunger.

The event organizers also presented prizes to those involved in the march. Bowman presented three awards to recognize “hunger fighters” who have helped support fundraising efforts over the years. Good Shepherd Parish (the collective Catholic organization made up of St. Augustine’s Church in Vineyard Haven, Our Lady Star of the Sea Church in Oak Bluffs, and St. Elizabeth’s Church in Edgartown), was honored for the efforts of its followers to raise funds and carry out activities to fight hunger on the island. The retired Reverend Michael R. Nagle, who has created a base for the march and advanced various programs and activities dealing with food insecurity, was recognized. Finally, the facilities manager of St. Augustine Church, Joe Capobianco, has been appointed; he was instrumental in maintaining relationships with the Boston Food Bank and his efforts to provide food and supplies to those who needed them during the winter were cited. Unfortunately, both people were unable to attend the event to receive their awards.

Certificates were also presented to the walkers, such as a new group of young participants from the Federated Church of Martha’s Vineyard and Martha’s Vineyard Hebrew Center youth group for the largest increase in participants.

The event ended with a prayer from Reverend Paul Fedak of Good Shepherd Parish, thanking everyone who gave their time, talents and efforts to fight hunger.

“No one should really go without food in our country today, or in our world. We ask you, Lord, to send your blessings on them and help them, ”Fedak prayed. “And help us all to love our brothers and sisters, as you love us. ”

For more information on the Martha’s Vineyard CROP Hunger Walk, visit bit.ly/MVHungerWalk21.


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Historic farmhouse in Voorhees NJ on the verge of becoming a vineyard and winery https://malcolmbluefarm.com/historic-farmhouse-in-voorhees-nj-on-the-verge-of-becoming-a-vineyard-and-winery/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 15:58:38 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/historic-farmhouse-in-voorhees-nj-on-the-verge-of-becoming-a-vineyard-and-winery/ There is exciting news from Voorhees, Camden County. Stafford Farms intends to turn into a vineyard, cellar and flower farm! No one could be more delighted with this development than I am. My parents took my brother and I to Stafford Farms often like children. We loved watching and feeding the horses and eating homemade […]]]>

There is exciting news from Voorhees, Camden County. Stafford Farms intends to turn into a vineyard, cellar and flower farm!

No one could be more delighted with this development than I am. My parents took my brother and I to Stafford Farms often like children. We loved watching and feeding the horses and eating homemade ice cream afterwards.

But in recent years the farm has been bought and sold several times, even by the township of Voorhees. The corner of the farm at Evesham Rd. And White Horse Road. is officially a preserved piece of Camden County.

Much of the land today belongs to Bill and Amy Green, according to 70and73.com. Bill grew up in Marlton and remembers the farm being in its prime including the Cow Tail ice cream bar I mentioned above.

Earlier this year, the Greens bought 70 acres of Stafford Farm, which is nearly 250 years old, and intends to dedicate about 30 of those acres to vines.

Just this week, the couple received the good news they were hoping for from the Camden County Agricultural Development Board: they have been allowed to operate Stafford Farms as a vineyard, stable, and flower and produce farm. Its official name will be Saddlehill Cellars on Historic Stafford Farms.

And, Bill Green is quite, saying 70and73.com, “We see this as a very long term investment. Generational.” His wife Amy is equally committed, saying, “I think this is all wonderful beyond my wildest dreams.”

I am okay!

Here are some of the things the new Saddlehill Cellars plans to offer visitors:

  • a 7,000 square foot tapas-style tasting room
  • small equine breeding
  • a new 4,320 square foot barn
  • seasonal fruit crops (such as strawberries and pumpkins)
  • flowers

Next month, farm staff will plant 250,000 tulip bulbs in hopes of a strong flowering in time for Mother’s Day next May. The other months of the year, they will switch to sunflowers!

Ooooh! And there are the ALPACAS!

This is such incredible news for Camden County, and there is literally so much to this story. You can read more about The Greens and the new Stafford Farms here.

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In season: Local pork – The Martha’s Vineyard Times https://malcolmbluefarm.com/in-season-local-pork-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 20:43:13 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/in-season-local-pork-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ The island’s farms continue with robust and diverse offerings of vegetables, eggs, dairy products – such as cheeses, yogurts and raw milk – and excellent local meat. You can find pasture raised chicken, beef, lamb, and a fantastic selection of pork. All of these locally raised animals have had quality lives on the vineyard, spending […]]]>

The island’s farms continue with robust and diverse offerings of vegetables, eggs, dairy products – such as cheeses, yogurts and raw milk – and excellent local meat. You can find pasture raised chicken, beef, lamb, and a fantastic selection of pork. All of these locally raised animals have had quality lives on the vineyard, spending time outside in the pastures, fed by humans who really take care of them.

Good breeding pays off with delicious and tasty meats. I recently bought a beautifully marbled T-bone steak from Gray Barn. I let it sit in fresh rosemary, garlic, a little mustard, olive oil, a teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce and black pepper, then toast it – it was delicious.

I often buy local pork; the pig offers a variety of options: sausage, hot italian, breakfast and chorizo, bacon, chops, roast, butt, loin, ribs, ham.

In my opinion, pork from small farms, raised without cruelty, is superior to pork from mass consumption. The flavor – well, it has flavor and is always juicy.

If you visit the farms around the island, there is a good chance that there is pork in the freezer. Also check out Jo Douglas, who only raises pigs at Fork to Pork, forktopork.com; you can see this locally raised pork on some island menus.

The reality is that most will not be able to buy local pork all the time; the best options at Cronig’s are Niman Ranch – I find their pork chops consistently delicious.

At this time of year, I think of homemade comfort foods; this pork mince recipe is perfect for fall.

Spicy minced pork with kale and winter squash

This hash is basically a base for a few meals – hash for breakfast with eggs, a fantastic pasta sauce (just add chicken broth or pasta water), or add two cans of beans. drained and rinsed egg whites and chicken broth for the soup.

Most of the ingredients I used were local. Hash couldn’t be simpler – my favorite type of cooking: clean, simple, local, very tasty and full of color. For 4.

¼ cup of OVE
1 pound hot Italian sausage, ground
4 cups of winter squash, such as delicata or butternut. Slice and peel if necessary, cut in half and remove seeds, cut into two inch pieces
1 tbsp. fresh rosemary, chopped
1 large or 2 medium shallots, halved and thinly sliced
3 medium leek halves or two large, rinsed then sliced
1 large bunch of kale or chard, lower stems removed, sliced, keeping the rib intact (chiffonade into large pieces), then soak and wring out

Preheat the oven to 400 °. In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, add 1 tablespoon of olive oil; heat over medium-high heat and brown the sausage, breaking up the meat so that it is not too thick.

Rinse your delicata squash well – you will leave the skin on and eat it. Peel your butternut. Cut in half, remove the seeds and cut into two-inch slices for the delicata or diced for the butternut squash. Stir in the remaining olive oil, season with salt and pepper. Bake at 400 ° for about 25 minutes.

Once your sausage is golden, add the rosemary, mix, then add your shallots and leeks. Mix, lower the heat and cook for about 5 minutes to soften the shallots and leeks.

Add the kale in a chiffonade, mix well. Cover for about 2 minutes. Continue cooking until the kale has softened. Remove from fire. Gently fold in the roasted squash.


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On the Farm: Gleaning – The Martha’s Vineyard Times https://malcolmbluefarm.com/on-the-farm-gleaning-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/on-the-farm-gleaning-the-marthas-vineyard-times/ When I started growing vegetables, I felt like a complete failure. In farms and markets, I saw piles of smooth, straight green beans, unblemished tomatoes, carrots that didn’t wrap around each other. The produce from my own garden was perfectly delicious, but by no means ready to market. How did these farms perform such magic? […]]]>

When I started growing vegetables, I felt like a complete failure. In farms and markets, I saw piles of smooth, straight green beans, unblemished tomatoes, carrots that didn’t wrap around each other. The produce from my own garden was perfectly delicious, but by no means ready to market. How did these farms perform such magic? The key, it turns out, is overproduction. Commercial farms have to plant an excess of what they need, so that they can choose the best for their customers. He leaves behind an abundance of imperfect crops in the field. Traditionally, farmers have gone out of their way to use leftovers, either by giving them away or using them in prepared foods, but ten years ago the Island Grown Initiative found that they could help farmers be more productive. , while increasing access to fresh and local foods. The Island Grown Gleaners were born, and now, every week, throughout the year, a group of dedicated volunteers gather in the fields of the island to harvest foods that are not pretty, but still locally grown and deliciously, making up for a significant part of that. waste and help IGI distribute it to community members in need.

I had the opportunity to join this group of gleaners on a beautiful weekday morning in early fall. Used to ‘island time’ as I am, I thought I was early when I got to the meeting point a few minutes before the 9am start time. Instead, I was just in time to see the rest of the group disappear around a greenhouse, sun hats and gardening gloves in hand, eager to get started. I caught up with the crew as longtime volunteers Jackie Hockhanson and Marjorie Pierce and today’s gleaning captains were giving tips on picking green beans, folding a few to show how we could. say which ones were too far away to be picked. There were specific instructions on which rows we were to pick and where the farm was still harvesting.

For farmers like Simon Athearn of Morning Glory Farm in Edgartown, communication and organization are critical to the success of IGI’s Gleaning Program. Allowing strangers to enter your meticulously planned fields requires a good dose of confidence that the plants and soil will remain in good condition and that the team will only take what has been assigned to them. He says this is really where the IGI shines. Simon can check his fields on Monday, leave a message for the IGI Gleaning manager, and be confident the gleaners will arrive Tuesday morning and execute the exact plan he had in mind.

They look more like trained professionals than a random assortment of volunteers. There are few experiences more humiliating than gathering with this group of seasoned gleaners. As I got up to stretch and rest my back, feeling pretty good in my half-full can of beans, these warm volunteers, most of them a few decades older than me, were squatting in the rows, working hard. , exchanging their full boxes for empty boxes to fill.

After about an hour, Jackie let everyone know that we were done with the official harvest, and the volunteers had a few minutes to pick beans for themselves, while our boxes were consolidated and brought to the distribution van, where the culmination of the gleaning program takes place: getting this food into the stomachs of islanders in need.

That day the beans were intended for elementary schools, where the creative lunch ladies would decide how best to use them in their lunch programs. But depending on the size and type of harvest, the time of year, and the needs of the community, the products gleaned go everywhere from the pantry and senior centers to the Wampanoag Women’s Center on a fairly consistent basis. , and many others as needed. . IGI also processes vegetables and prepares meals for distribution in partnership with local chefs and the Slough Cove Foundation.

According to Kayte Morris, Senior Director of Food Equity Programs for Island Grown Initiative, the goal is to get the right food to the right people at the right time. It takes a lot of coordination and knowing who is growing what and who needs it.

Fortunately, they have their leader, Astrid Tilton, tasked with figuring all this out. Astrid is passionate about food fairness and believes that everyone should be able to obtain food in a convenient and enjoyable way. She has spent years building relationships not only with farmers, but also with Island organizations, and people feel comfortable telling her what they want and what they don’t. . She would much rather find another recipient for a delivery, or feed them to the cattle at Island Grown Farm, than leave a receiving organization feeling stuck with something it can’t use.

With the support of her gleaners and the farmers at Island Grown Farm, Astrid continually improves the system, works on more efficient harvesting methods, and keeps abreast of new products being grown on the island. It’s a constantly evolving program that works because it plays on each other’s strengths and what each has to share. Farmers have the power to be more generous with their generosity, volunteers feel they are receiving a needed service, Islanders in need are given a helping hand, and all of these fun veggies get the appreciation they really deserve.


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The lives of vineyard owners and winemakers are much more unglamorous and unpredictable than you might think https://malcolmbluefarm.com/the-lives-of-vineyard-owners-and-winemakers-are-much-more-unglamorous-and-unpredictable-than-you-might-think/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/the-lives-of-vineyard-owners-and-winemakers-are-much-more-unglamorous-and-unpredictable-than-you-might-think/ The romance associated with winemaking often breaks down in the face of the hard work required for the business. Charles O’Rear / Getty Images Managing a vineyard can be a complicated balancing act between several aspects of the business. The weather is a ruthless wildcard – forest fires, frost, and hailstorms can kill almost a […]]]>

The romance associated with winemaking often breaks down in the face of the hard work required for the business. Charles O’Rear / Getty Images

  • Managing a vineyard can be a complicated balancing act between several aspects of the business.

  • The weather is a ruthless wildcard – forest fires, frost, and hailstorms can kill almost a year of grapes.

  • Winery owners love the outdoors, the complex winemaking process and the end product.

Despite years of studying and learning from professional winemakers before opening a vineyard, the amount of work required to run a winery again surprised Tony Smith, the owner of Cave Ab Astris in the Texas wine country.

“Winemaking is romantic for some people, and sometimes it’s romantic. But there’s just a lot of hard work,” he told Insider. “It’s a lot harder than I thought.”

Boutique vineyard owners told Insider they oscillated between spending hours in the fields pruning, picking grapes, and doing farm chores; guide guests through wine tastings; governing the tedious process of winemaking and handling all the typical tasks of running a business.

“Making wine is not an easy process,” Lloyd Davis, owner of Corner 103 in Sonoma, Calif., said. An unexpected frost, a pervasive pest, abnormal hailstorms or raging forest fires can wipe out almost an entire year of work.

In California, Davis left nearly a full year of harvest on the vines after raging forest fires have suffocated the vineyard in a layer of ash and imbued the grapes with an unpleasant flavor similar to cigarette smoke. In Texas, a week of freezing cold and hailstorms killed the buds of Smith’s flowering vines and brought her production down to a fraction of the previous year. On the East coast, lanterns can decimate hectares of plants by sucking the invigorating sap from the vines.

“In the world of wine, there’s always something going on, whether it’s the weather, rain or no rain, wildfires,” Davis said. “There is always something to keep you on your toes.”

However, Davis said one of the pleasures of owning a vineyard is creating a wine he enjoys drinking, a process that sits at the junction of scientific precision, personal taste, and intuition.

“It’s like cooking,” he said. “There is a recipe for making a wine, but if you follow the recipe, you are going to make something barely drinkable.”

Once the grapes are pressed, the juice ferments over periods of several months in vats, oak barrels and bottles. Davis tastes the liquid throughout the process to know what type of barrel to put the wine in, whether to add a piece of oak wood to the barrel to bring the wine closer to its ideal flavor, and when the wine is ready to go. to be freed.

When deciding which grapes to pick each day – around October, he chooses Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot – he measures the sugar content but bases his decision on whether the grapes have a compelling flavor.

“As any winemaker will tell you, great wine begins in the vineyard,” said Theodora Lee, owner of Theopolis vineyards.

It is tedious work. While Lee enjoys fine wine, farming and the outdoors, she said running her business leaves her with almost no time for personal relationships, while the intense heat, drought and wildfires linked to global warming make grapes more and more vulnerable.

Problems related to the pandemic also reduced income for winemakers who relied on major events, restaurant sales and corporate wine tastings before the pandemic.

Chris Wachira, the owner of Wachira wines, struggles to staff without additional money to attract candidates. Although she wishes to export wines to Kenya, her home country, where she has never been able to find Californian wine, she halted the expansion of her business due to an overwhelming shortage of bottles. in glass to ship its products.

“It quadrupled my stress level,” said Wachira. “There’s always a new problem to be solved.”

Read the original article on Business intern


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