Livestock – Malcolm Blue Farm http://malcolmbluefarm.com/ Mon, 16 May 2022 11:11:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-14.png Livestock – Malcolm Blue Farm http://malcolmbluefarm.com/ 32 32 Effective policies, legislation needed to market livestock ― FG https://malcolmbluefarm.com/effective-policies-legislation-needed-to-market-livestock-%e2%80%95-fg/ Mon, 16 May 2022 11:11:21 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/effective-policies-legislation-needed-to-market-livestock-%e2%80%95-fg/ The federal government has stated that the commercialization of the livestock industry requires effective policies and legislation to create wealth for farmers and ensure increased national revenue generation. To achieve this, the government has said it is relevant to work with a wider range of national and international actors to accelerate transformation and reposition the […]]]>

The federal government has stated that the commercialization of the livestock industry requires effective policies and legislation to create wealth for farmers and ensure increased national revenue generation.

To achieve this, the government has said it is relevant to work with a wider range of national and international actors to accelerate transformation and reposition the livestock sector towards increased availability and accessibility of animals for Nigerians. as well as for export.

The Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Dr. Ernest Umakhihe said so during a National Livestock Policy document validation meeting in Abuja.

Represented by the Federal Director of Livestock, Ms. Winnie Lai-Solarin, the Permanent Secretary noted that the transformation of the livestock sector will not only increase job opportunities but also improve livelihoods and well-being. be Nigerians.

He said the meeting aims to come up with a comprehensive and more comprehensive workable policy that will be acceptable to the National Board of Agriculture.

Umakhihe further noted that the meeting also raised understanding and awareness about animal husbandry and related services for sustainable livestock development.

In her remarks, the Federal Director of Animal Husbandry, Mrs Winnie Lai-Solarin, who was represented by the Deputy Director and Head of Animal Husbandry and Conservation, Mr Ibrahim Onipe, said that the characteristics of Low productivity of native species and different ecotypes of farmed animals are major issues affecting the livestock industry in Nigeria.

She lamented that exotic breeds continually undergo genetic improvement in response to market-driven breeding and productivity goals, while strains indigenous to Nigeria remain static and stunted.

According to her, other challenges hampering the livestock sub-sector include insufficient availability of feed and fodder and unsustainability of national livestock survey and breeding projects, in addition to the lack of provision of essential infrastructure for the genetic improvement of Nigerian animals.

“The animal production sub-sector plays an important role in the country’s agro-economy and contributes to the quality nutrition of citizens and the overall food security status of our nation.

“It also contributes significantly to the socio-economic livelihoods of the people and those in the areas of the livestock value chain. Despite these roles, the animal production sub-sector faces many institutional issues and challenges that have prevented it from developing alongside other agricultural sub-sectors,” she added.

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Government releases Breed-Wise Livestock and Poultry Report based on 20th Livestock Census https://malcolmbluefarm.com/government-releases-breed-wise-livestock-and-poultry-report-based-on-20th-livestock-census/ Fri, 13 May 2022 06:37:00 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/government-releases-breed-wise-livestock-and-poultry-report-based-on-20th-livestock-census/ The results are based on breed-specific data obtained during the 2018-2019 Livestock Census. Cattle farming Native and Nondescribable cattle make up 73% of the global cattle population of 19.35 crore, while Exotic and Crossbred cattle […]]]>



The results are based on breed-specific data obtained during the 2018-2019 Livestock Census.








Cattle farming





Native and Nondescribable cattle make up 73% of the global cattle population of 19.35 crore, while Exotic and Crossbred cattle make up about 26%. However, when it comes to poultry population, desi poultry accounts for only 36% of the total poultry population of 80.78 crore, while improved species accounts for 64% of the total poultry population.












These results are based on breed-specific data obtained from the 2018-2019 Livestock Census. Parshottam Rupala, Union Fisheries Minister, Breeding, and Dairy, released the report on Thursday. The census was notable in that it was the first time the government had used electronic tablets to collect data, and livestock and poultry birds were counted according to breeds recognized by the National Bureau of Animal Genetic Resources ( NBAGR).

Given the importance of the livestock industry, policymakers and researchers need to identify various breeds so that species can be genetically updated for maximum product performance and for other purposes, according to a official statement released after publication.

The NBAGR recorded 184 recognized native/exotic and crossbreeds of 19 different species in this report. This study covers four exotic/crossbred cow breeds as well as 41 recognized indigenous breeds. Cattle make up 36.04 percent of the livestock population, according to the census.












Of the total exotic/crossbred cattle, Crossbred Jersey has the largest proportion at 49.3% compared to Crossbred’s 39.3% Friesian Holstein (HF). The Gir, Lakhimi and Sahiwal breeds make up the majority of the native cattle population of 14.21 crores. The Murrah breed, which is popular in Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan, provides 42.8% of the bison population.

In terms of sheep, the country has three exotic species and 26 native breeds. The Corriedale breed is the most common pure exotic breed, making up 17.33% of the total, while the Nellore breed is the most common native breed, making up 20% of the total.

There are 28 native goat breeds, with the Black bengal race contributing the most (18.6%). Among pigs, crossbred pigs make up 86.6% of the total, with Yorkshire making up 8.4% and native pigs making up 3.9%.












The Aseel breed contributes significantly to both backyard poultry and commercial poultry farms in desi poultry.











First published: May 13, 2022, 10:34 IST



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Job: Animal Husbandry Manager at International Medical Corps https://malcolmbluefarm.com/job-animal-husbandry-manager-at-international-medical-corps/ Tue, 10 May 2022 19:00:17 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/job-animal-husbandry-manager-at-international-medical-corps/ International Medical Corps is therefore looking for a suitable candidate to fill the position of The Livestock Officer will be based in Shani. Position: Nigerian Nationals Only Job summary: The Livestock Officer will be responsible for implementing and monitoring the overall management of the Livestock and Aquaculture activities of the Nutrition, Livelihoods and Resilience project […]]]>

International Medical Corps is therefore looking for a suitable candidate to fill the position of

The Livestock Officer will be based in Shani.

Position: Nigerian Nationals Only

Job summary:

The Livestock Officer will be responsible for implementing and monitoring the overall management of the Livestock and Aquaculture activities of the Nutrition, Livelihoods and Resilience project at Shani LGA, which includes the distribution of poultry and small ruminants, feed distribution, disease control and training. The Livestock Manager will be technically supervised and supported by the Program Manager.

Duties and Responsibilities

  • Conduct a rapid assessment to identify specific operational villages/locations for livestock asset creation activities.
  • Lead the beneficiary selection process according to the criteria set by the project in collaboration with local administrations and community representatives.
  • Lead community participatory planning exercise and development of community action plans for livestock asset creation activities.
  • Lead the implementation of the livestock asset creation component of the project in accordance with the set schedule, budget and resources and implement the project within the specified parameters.
  • Actively participate in the conduct of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) in collaboration with the M&E manager.
  • Actively participate in the formation of local committees and community mobilization.
  • Facilitate and provide trainings on animal husbandry and disease control and livestock disease control in collaboration with relevant ministries.
  • Joint planning and delivery of capacity building activities with the Program Manager.
  • Maximize the nutritional sensitivity of the project by working closely with the nutrition program team.
  • Provide capacity building and support to livestock assistants/volunteers under your supervision.
  • Prepare and submit regular internal reports on all breeding and asset creation activities.
  • Prepare external reports in donor format.
  • Implement the distribution of poultry, small ruminants and feed.
  • Build beneficiaries’ capacities in animal husbandry, disease monitoring and control, hygienic handling and value addition of livestock products, and carry out regular scheduled visits to their farms.
  • Participate in assessment missions related to food security and livelihoods with other stakeholders in the region representing International Medical Corps.
  • Actively represent International Medical Corps in food security and livelihoods and early recovery cluster coordination meetings.
  • Capture lessons learned from monitoring and evaluations, document successes, replicate successful projects and scale them up.
  • Understand food security gaps and come up with a project idea, write concept notes and share them with the technical supervisor.
  • If necessary, lead the national staff recruitment process in close collaboration with the nutrition coordination and the FLS manager, human resources and train the newly hired staff.
  • Work with the M&E team to develop a tracking tool, send a weekly update to the program manager, closely monitor and inform the team if the situation on the ground changes quickly.
  • Prevention of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse
  • Actively promote Prevention of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) standards within International Medical Corps and among beneficiaries served by International Medical Corps.

Compliance and Ethics:

Promotes and encourages a culture of compliance and ethics throughout International Medical Corps. Depending on the position, maintains a clear understanding of, and adheres to, International Medical Corps and donor compliance and ethics standards. Performs work with the highest level of integrity. Communicate these values ​​to staff and partners and ask them to adhere to these values.

Qualifications and experience:

  • B. Sc in Veterinary Medicine/Animal Science or other relevant field with four years of field experience in food security and livelihoods, livestock development, including experience in early recovery and development.
  • Experience in assessment, local livestock disease surveillance, community consultations, program design and evaluation, and technical training and support.
  • An up-to-date understanding of the concepts of food security, emergency response, early recovery, food security and livelihoods.
  • Familiarity with the design and programming processes of different donors.
  • In-depth analytical skills demonstrating an understanding of current concepts, priorities and issues in program monitoring, data collection and evaluation.
  • Skills in implementing livestock development programs.
  • Ability to exercise tact, diplomacy and resourcefulness in dealing with senior officials of donor agencies, international organizations and other foreign and domestic government officials and partners.
  • Must have excellent written and oral communication skills in English and the ability to work collaboratively with other International Medical Corps departments, donors, non-governmental organizations and the private sector.
  • Actively promote Prevention of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) standards within International Medical Corps and among beneficiaries served by International Medical Corps.
  • Accountability is necessary to develop and carry out activities.

Key skills:

  • Strong communication skills: oral, written and presentation skills.
  • Must be a team player and culturally sensitive.
  • Demonstrated proficiency in computer applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, email and Internet use
  • Strong leadership, team spirit, conflict resolution and ability to achieve IMC’s strategic objectives.
  • Extremely flexible and able to deal with stressful situations

Equal opportunities

International Medical Corps is proud to provide equal employment opportunities to all qualified employees and applicants without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, age , disability or veteran status.
Due to the urgent need for the position, applications received will be reviewed on a rolling basis.
International Medical Corps never asks job applicants for a fee, payment, or any other monetary transaction. If you are asked for money in connection with this recruitment, please report it to International Medical Corps at the reporting email address provided at the end of this document. International Medical Corps reporting email address: www.InternationalMedicalCorps.ethicspoint.com Please do not submit your resume or application to the reporting email address, it will not be considered for consideration

All applications should be directed to the Human Resources Coordinator, International Medical Corps via email: [email protected]

Applicants MUST indicate the position and location they are applying for as the subject line of their email, cover letter and resume must be in a single Microsoft Word document or applications will not be considered.

Click here to apply

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Climate change hits livestock https://malcolmbluefarm.com/climate-change-hits-livestock/ Mon, 09 May 2022 13:35:53 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/climate-change-hits-livestock/ On November 16, 2021, Gary Baars of Abbotsford, British Columbia began loading his 200 dairy cows onto a cattle trailer 20 at a time, to get them to higher ground before more rains arrived. . His farm was still dry, but Baars was taking no chances: his cousin and neighbor, pig farmer John Guliker, had […]]]>

On November 16, 2021, Gary Baars of Abbotsford, British Columbia began loading his 200 dairy cows onto a cattle trailer 20 at a time, to get them to higher ground before more rains arrived. . His farm was still dry, but Baars was taking no chances: his cousin and neighbor, pig farmer John Guliker, had to be rescued the day before when floodwaters rose “probably 10 feet deep”. Guliker and 14 workers, who were trying to evacuate pigs, had to climb onto a roof. The men were rescued by boat, but thousands of Guliker pigs drowned.

Guliker wasn’t the only cattle rancher hammered by record flooding that ravaged British Columbia last fall. An astonishing number of farm animals – at least 628,000 chickens, 420 cows and 12,000 pigs, according to the provincial government – died in the floodwaters. In total, about 200 square kilometers of southern British Columbia, encompassing the low, fertile Sumas prairie, were inundated with more than 250 millimeters of rain per day. With over $1 billion a year in farm-gate sales, the potential impact was huge not only for Abbotsford ranchers, but also for area fruit, vegetable and nut growers.

All over the world, the climate crisis is ravaging farms. Last summer’s heat dome across much of western and central North America shrunk crops and pastures, forcing farmers to send cows to the slaughterhouse before they could are starving. In California, ranchers have struggled to evacuate their herds in the face of record-breaking wildfires that have charred millions of acres of land in recent summers. In North Carolina in 2018, an estimated 3.5 million poultry and 5,500 pigs perished in flooding caused by Hurricane Florence. The costs add up: Flooding in Nebraska wiped out $400 million worth of livestock in 2019 alone.

What is clear is that today’s livestock infrastructure is built for a climate that no longer exists. Farmers face huge livestock challenges trying to protect animals from extreme weather conditions that lead to flooding, scorching heat and drought-induced food shortages. Will barns need to be redesigned and fitted with expensive cooling systems? Could farmers have to create evacuation plans in case of flooding or forest fires? And what happens when their farms are destroyed and insurance companies deem them too risky to insure? Global warming is also attracting new invasive species, diseases and cross-border pathogens, further threatening animal welfare.

Dan Weary, NSERC (Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada) Industrial Research Chair in Animal Welfare at the University of British Columbia, says the November floods were marked by remarkable feats of heroism as farmers attempted to save the animals in their care. “Farmers judge themselves in terms of stewardship of their animals,” Weary says. But the huge loss of lives and livelihoods indicates that the agricultural sector needs to take stock in the coming months and consider redesigning farms to make them more resilient.

“It’s going to be an ongoing problem,” Weary says. Especially since the floodplain of Sumas, British Columbia sits in what was once Sumas Lake, before it was drained a century ago to take advantage of the fertile soil.

Sean Smukler, chair of agriculture and environment in the faculty of lands and food systems at the University of British Columbia, says that if we are unwilling to invest in the expensive infrastructure needed to prevent flooding, we will have to take a different approach approach. That may mean switching to flood-resistant crops, although for cattle ranchers in the region, the safest solution is to relocate their operations altogether. It will be a “negotiation between the company and the producers, to decide whether or not we are willing to pay the price to protect them,” Smukler says. “We have to pay more for our food if we want something sustainable.”

This is going to be a perennial problem.

-Dan Weary, NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Animal Welfare at the University of British Columbia

Camille Labchuk, an animal rights lawyer and executive director of Animal Justice, an Ottawa-based nonprofit, says the size of farm facilities must be reduced to make rescue attempts viable, with farmers creating pathways to evacuation and emergency food and water supplies for the creatures. under their care. The current number of animals makes this proposition questionable. British Columbia’s poultry operations have more than 54,000 birds per flock and seven flocks per year — a number that is impossible “to realistically plan to evacuate,” says Labchuk. In the United States, for example, poultry farms can house millions of birds, an even more unlikely scenario.

Animal welfare laws also need to be revamped with disaster management in mind, Labchuk adds, pointing to the agricultural disaster in late June when soaring temperatures in British Columbia killed more than 650,000 farm animals. – mostly chickens crammed into cages.

Livestock specialists suggest a different approach. Veterinarian Tim Kurt is the Scientific Program Director of Advanced Animal Systems at the Food and Agriculture Research Foundation, based in Washington, DC. It highlights research aimed at making animals more resilient so they can withstand extreme weather conditions. The US livestock industry loses more than $2.36 billion a year to heat stress: Animals eat less (which impairs growth), produce less milk and become less fertile, Kurt says.

Studies are ongoing on nutritional interventions and supplements that specifically reduce heat stress in cattle.

Scientists are also looking at gene editing: identifying traits that allow livestock in places like sub-Saharan Africa to withstand drought and heat. African cows are generally inefficient milk and meat producers, and a simple cross would produce an inferior animal. However, CRISPR gene editing, which allows genes to be added or deleted in living organisms, could be used to improve “the animal’s heat tolerance without affecting milk production, giving it great potential,” says Kurt.

Unlike other GMO manipulations, CRISPR uses genes from the same species.

In 100 years, I expect there will be almost no animal agriculture left on Earth.

-Lenore Newman, Director of the Institute of Food and Agriculture at the University of the Fraser Valley

Growers are also trying to keep their barns cool by using fans, misters, sprayers and evaporative coolers when temperatures soar. However, such measures increase water and energy consumption, calling into question their sustainability in drought-affected regions. In an effort to convince more ranches and farms to switch to clean energy, the Rural Energy for America program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, provides grants to help farmers and ranchers improve their efficiency energy and developing renewable energies.

The irony is that animal production itself is fueling climate change, creating 14.5% of the world’s greenhouse gases, such as methane and nitrous oxide, according to the Food Organization of the United Nations. and agriculture. “Animal agriculture accounts for the lion’s share of food’s contribution to the global climate problem,” says Lenore Newman, director of the Institute of Food and Agriculture at the University of the Fraser Valley. in Abbotsford. Newman envisions a future where proteins are derived from plants, lab-grown meats and cow-free dairy. “In 100 years, I expect there will be almost no animal agriculture left on Earth. If we can produce identical meat and dairy products at a lower price, it’s better for you and for the environment,” she says.

What can we do immediately? Amber Itle, acting state veterinarian for Washington, says the agriculture industry in Canada and the United States must increase cross-border collaboration, including emergency preparedness efforts and coordinated responses to minimize impacts disasters like the floods that hit the Pacific Northwest last grave. “We need to stop viewing our border as a line we cannot cross,” Itle said. “We must be prepared to use new technologies, policies and tools on farms to help prevent, prepare for and respond to animal health emergencies and mitigate the impacts.”

Henk Ovink is the special envoy for international water affairs in the Netherlands. He says it is not just international collaboration but an alliance with Mother Nature herself that will be needed to control the impacts of climate change. The Low-lying Netherlands took land out of agricultural production, compensating dairy farmers for property and moving their operations to higher ground. “I think it’s very simple: don’t even try to control nature,” says Ovink.

Back in Abbotsford, Baars’ farm eventually found itself underwater. Although he managed to get his cows out in time, it took five weeks before he could resume full dairy farming, as he had to replace rusted milking equipment from the floods. Baars is worried about the future. The flood, which was supposed to be an event every 500 years, “could happen again in six months,” he says. He doesn’t have a plan in place in case of else.

“We are counting on our government to modernize the dikes in our area. If there is another flood in the future, which is very possible, we hope to get more notice and evacuate quickly,” he says. “We have to turn to the politicians and light a fire and say, ‘We have to stop this. I wouldn’t want to see another flood, I can tell you that.

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Veterinary services at the farmers’ doorstep https://malcolmbluefarm.com/veterinary-services-at-the-farmers-doorstep/ Sat, 07 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/veterinary-services-at-the-farmers-doorstep/ Now farmers in Karnataka can call toll free number 1962 to avail emergency veterinary ambulance services Now farmers in Karnataka can call toll free number 1962 to avail emergency veterinary ambulance services The state government on Saturday reported 70 veterinary mobile ambulances to provide emergency services to domestic animals at farmers’ doorsteps. Union Fisheries, Animal […]]]>

Now farmers in Karnataka can call toll free number 1962 to avail emergency veterinary ambulance services

Now farmers in Karnataka can call toll free number 1962 to avail emergency veterinary ambulance services

The state government on Saturday reported 70 veterinary mobile ambulances to provide emergency services to domestic animals at farmers’ doorsteps.

Union Fisheries, Animal Husbandry and Dairy Minister Parshottam Rupala and Chief Minister Basavaraj Bommai launched the facility.

Livestock Minister Prabhu Chavan said 275 animal ambulances would be deployed. In the first phase, 70 ambulances were delivered. The state has 290 lakh pets and on average an ambulance would provide service to one lakh pet.

The mobile veterinary services project would provide prompt treatment upon receiving free calls to 1962 at the livestock owner’s door and help maintain animal health, thereby increasing animal productivity, Chavan said. The Center financed the ambulance project. Similar projects had already been launched in Tamil Nadu, Telangana and Gujarat.

When a distress call from the cattle owner is received at any time of the day at the 1962 Emergency Response Center basic details are gathered and the information disseminated to the nearest ambulance . The ambulance, accompanied by the veterinarian and the assistant, goes to the door of the breeder, assesses the condition of the sick cattle and provides treatment on the spot.

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FG begins national training for breeders on animal feed production https://malcolmbluefarm.com/fg-begins-national-training-for-breeders-on-animal-feed-production/ Mon, 02 May 2022 03:33:48 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/fg-begins-national-training-for-breeders-on-animal-feed-production/ The federal government says it is determined to decisively tackle the escalating cost of animal feed in the country by encouraging the use of inferior grain and climate-friendly animal feed production. The Permanent Secretary of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Dr. Ernest Umakhihe revealed this during capacity building and feed distribution programs […]]]>

The federal government says it is determined to decisively tackle the escalating cost of animal feed in the country by encouraging the use of inferior grain and climate-friendly animal feed production.

The Permanent Secretary of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Dr. Ernest Umakhihe revealed this during capacity building and feed distribution programs organized recently by the Department of Livestock Services of the ministry in Gwagwalada, Abuja.

The permanent secretary who was represented at the event by the ministry’s director of special duties, Ms Fawsat Lawal, said the high cost of animal feed has forced many millers and herders out of business.

According to him, “It is with the awareness of the strategic importance of the livestock sub-sector in the growth of our national economy that we are organizing this capacity building program to teach our millers and breeders the sources alternatives available to them to provide nutritious food. for their animals at a lower cost.

According to him, statistically, the livestock sub-sector supports more than one billion people worldwide, which represents more than 40% of the world’s agricultural gross domestic product (GDP) and provides more than 35% of the global protein intake.

“It is gratifying to note that the contribution of livestock goes beyond meat, milk and eggs, but also plays an important role in climate change,” he said.

He informed that the capacity building program is not only in line with the agenda of the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development in charting a new course for the livestock industry and agribusiness in Nigeria, but it is also in line with the agenda of the current administration to leverage the agricultural sector for wealth creation, job creation and diversification of the economy.

He instructed the participants to make good use of the opportunity to gain new knowledge that will help them improve their businesses.

Earlier in her welcoming remarks, the Director of the Department of Livestock Services, Ms. Winnie Lai-Solarin, said the program is a national capacity building program to help herders across the country improve their livelihoods. and ensuring food and feed safety.

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Confab assesses the challenges of implementing the livestock transformation plan https://malcolmbluefarm.com/confab-assesses-the-challenges-of-implementing-the-livestock-transformation-plan/ Sun, 01 May 2022 03:20:14 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/confab-assesses-the-challenges-of-implementing-the-livestock-transformation-plan/ Jhe Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development organized a National Livestock Transformation Conference in Abuja to discuss issues affecting the implementation of the National Livestock Transformation Plan (NLTP) – an initiative of public-private partnership aimed at strengthening the livestock sub-sector. Stakeholders felt that the challenges facing the growth of livestock value chains are manifold, […]]]>

Jhe Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development organized a National Livestock Transformation Conference in Abuja to discuss issues affecting the implementation of the National Livestock Transformation Plan (NLTP) – an initiative of public-private partnership aimed at strengthening the livestock sub-sector.

Stakeholders felt that the challenges facing the growth of livestock value chains are manifold, including misconceptions and misinformation about the program concept.

Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development, Dr. Mohammed Mahmood Abubakar, who spoke at length at the conference, listed challenges in the sector, including low breed quality, poor husbandry practices, access limited to quality inputs and finance, weak animal health and extension services, livestock conflicts between herders and farmers, cattle rustling, banditry and other security issues.

In addition to the challenges listed, the Minister admitted that “incoherent government policies, poorly functioning institutional frameworks, linkages, regulations and standards, have failed to bring about meaningful and sustainable transformation in the sector and a limited impact on the livelihoods of actors along the value of the sector”. Chains.

“Indeed, the potential promise of the sector has been further threatened in recent times with the widespread insurgency and conflict in the northeast, central belt and many other parts of the country, coupled with the overwhelming consequences and negative impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic, Floods and Droughts The waves of destruction and demographic upheaval are so huge and unprecedented that livestock businesses are significantly disrupted, with animals being wiped out in many cases.

Dr Andrew Kwasari, the President’s Special Assistant for Agriculture, expressed concern that many people do not understand the program and continue to spread missing information about it, adding that there are documents detailing all program components.

While he provided an update on implementation so far, he said 10 of the 22 states that have indicated interest in participating in the program have already established the livestock processing office.

He said four states have identified and mapped classified grazing reserves in their area, including setting up an office to receive seed funding from the FG and are ready to take off.

The project is expected to swallow 100 billion naira, of which the federal government is expected to provide about 40% as seed money, while states and private sector investments are to pilot the system in implementing states.

In addition to all the efforts of the presidency, Dr Abubakar said that to address these multi-faceted challenges and unlock the potential of the country’s animal resources, the federal government was “working with a wide range of national and international stakeholders to accelerate transformation in the livestock sector and meet contemporary aspirations for increased productivity and resilience.

He said the result of such collaboration is the National Livestock Transformation Plan (NLTP) already initiated and implemented by state and non-state actors with national and state governments.

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The DNP region of Rajasthan faces a major problem in livestock production and management https://malcolmbluefarm.com/the-dnp-region-of-rajasthan-faces-a-major-problem-in-livestock-production-and-management/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:27:21 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/the-dnp-region-of-rajasthan-faces-a-major-problem-in-livestock-production-and-management/ Tar The Great Indian Desert or Thar Desert is the easternmost limit of the Persian-Arabian Desert reaching 1.3 million square miles [1.3 million sq km] in India and Pakistan. It is one of the most beautiful places in our vast and diverse […]]]>







Tar





The Great Indian Desert or Thar Desert is the easternmost limit of the Persian-Arabian Desert reaching 1.3 million square miles [1.3 million sq km] in India and Pakistan. It is one of the most beautiful places in our vast and diverse world and contradicts the popular notion that deserts are arid deserts; this unique place hosts a rich variety of lives.












The purpose of building the Desert National Park Wildlife Sanctuary is to preserve a representative sample of the desert ecosystem for future generations. The 1976 National Commission on Agriculture emphasized the establishment of a biosphere reserve in the desert region. The vision was also to protect the desert ecosystem in a natural way in the future. This management plan has been prepared to achieve the objectives envisaged during the construction of the park. Every step is taken to keep the unique characteristics of the desert as they are.

The Thar Desert extends over 2.3 million km2, 85% of which is in India and the remaining half in Pakistan. It covers more than 2 million km2 in Rajasthan and extends to Gujarat, Punjab and Haryana. Native plants and animals have adapted to life in harsh conditions. Man, through his long association with the desert, has changed a number of cultural practices, which are not evident in other parts of India. Several species of domestic animals and plants have become accustomed to living in the desert. The Thar is the most populated desert in the world and over the past 4-5 decades has seen tremendous growth in human and animal populations as well as deeply unpopular development activities. Gas and oil are found in large quantities in many desert areas. The desert is undergoing rapid changes, which will have a lasting and sometimes irreversible effect on the fragile ecosystem of this unique ecosystem.












Livestock are an important asset for poor rural people in developing countries, but they face a major challenge in accessing seasonal foods. A study was conducted to assess the available and potential feeds for the production of feed and livestock in the southern hemisphere. A flow verification tool was used to collect the required data. The assessment includes group discussions and individual interviews. The results showed that seasonal shortages, lack of livestock supply and lack of watering facilities are the main challenges facing livestock production in the study areas. Pastures and collard greens were the main food source for animals during the rainy season and crop residues, fodder trees and shrubs were the main food sources during the dry season.

Floors:

The Thar Desert is a temporary shelter between large wind belts. The whole desert consists of low slopes covered with sand dunes and barren hills. Throughout the Thar Desert as a whole, mixed, medium-sized and fine-grained sediments abound. The desert floor is limited only to the world of “magra”. Windblown sand, due to aerodynamic processes and biotic disturbances, forms shifting sand dunes, which over time change places or move from place to place. Shifting sand dunes are very common near Sam, Khuri, Dav and Miajlar. Most dunes are occupied by pioneer plants such as Aerva javanica, Aristida sp. Polygonoid Calligonum, Cenchrus sp. Cyperus atkinsonii etc. which leads to the stabilization of the dunes. Interdune depressions are composed of erosion and dry beds of desert streams. The salt pans are very limited and there is no permanent water source. However, seasonal streams in an area called ‘Nalas’ flow a few days immediately after the rains. Rainwater is collected and raised in the ‘Khadeens’ and ‘Nadis’ for drinking and planting in the wetlands.

Types of forests, cover and fauna:

The great Indian bustard (Ardeotis nigriceps) or Indian bustard found on the Indian subcontinent. A large bird with a horizontal body and long bare legs giving it the appearance of an ostrich, this bird is one of the most difficult birds to fly.












A major problem in animal production

Food shortages, farmers’ insufficient knowledge of animal production, genetic deficiency of traditional cattle breeds, disease and land scarcity have been major issues affecting animal production in all agro-ecologies with declining value. .

Some of the most significant environmental issues affecting livestock production include global warming, tropical deforestation, water use issues, ethnic and desert areas, and livestock-wildlife interactions.

Many physical, biological and socio-economic factors act together to influence the environment and the level of animal husbandry practiced in any region. Climate, which includes both temperature and precipitation, can affect any animal’s ability to survive and reproduce in several ways.

Limited availability of quality breeding bulls. Lack of vaccines and vaccination planning. Due to industrial growth and urbanization, many pastures are degraded or occupied. Diversion of food ingredients and fodder for industrial use.

These three challenges – feeding the growing population, providing farmers with livelihoods and protecting the environment – ​​must be addressed if we are to achieve lasting progress in any of them.

  • Healthy cows are essential for good beef and milk production.

  • Provision of shelter. The provision of adequate shelter is another human factor that contributes to animal production.

  • Farming skills.

  • Availability of water.

  • Diseases and epidemics.

  • Weather.

Current challenges in the global food system

Let’s start with the most obvious. The global food system is expected to provide safe and nutritious food to people that could grow from 7.5 billion people today to nearly 10 billion people by 2050. economically, there will be a demand for meat, fish and milk.

However, food production is only part of the food system. The agro-food sector also provides livelihoods for millions of people. Globally, the poorest people live in rural areas where food production is often the most important economic activity. Today there are approximately 570 million farms in the world and millions more people are employed in food-related activities.

The global food system has a great natural history. In fact, agriculture occupies about 40% of the world, more than any other human activity. In addition, irrigation of agricultural crops accounts for 70% of global water use, and agriculture directly affects around 11% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (mainly livestock). Expansion of agricultural land can also lead to deforestation, GHG extinction and biodiversity loss.












The advantages of farming are:

  • Animal husbandry helps us provide proper food, shelter, and disease protection in companion animals. Therefore, breeding helps in managing pets.

  • Breeding helps us develop more productive species of different breeds. Thus, animal husbandry increases the availability of various food products such as milk, eggs, and meat, which are found in pets.

  • Livestock contributes to improving the quality of life of farmers. Due to the high production of animal products, farmers’ incomes are increasing.

The disadvantages of:

  • Animals eat grass with large holes, thereby destroying vegetation.

  • Overfeeding in the forests has led to soil erosion.

  • This disrupts the local ecosystem. It inhibits normal feeding activity due to domestication.

  • A major source of methane, one of the main causes of global warming.

  • The spread of the disease

  • High maintenance costs

A major source of increased animal production in the study area:

Livestock play an important role in food – notably through the consumption of animal products by breeders and their families; and indirectly for the sale of animals and animal products as a source of income.

In the past, food security studies that focused on calculating grain production and the importance of livestock in food security were rarely tested. It is said that the role of livestock in food is often underestimated. However, it is not easy to quantify the actual role of livestock to include elements without direct food production; an effective method of measuring the value of livestock has yet to be established. Livestock can be viewed as a production system as shown in Figure 1, which divides the system into the following: inputs; animal health; animals that are a production unit; product results; and a market that buys products and sets a price for the manufacturer. Each of these steps is tested.

  • Nutrition and food.

  • Breeding and Breeding.

  • Health and disease. Economic factor.

  • Economic and Social. Environmental factor

  • Habitat and environment: Luxury needs.

Reference:

  • Park Management, Land Use Patterns and People’s Perceptions: Case of Desert National Park, Rajasthan, India. Nagothu Udaya Sekhar, Ulrik A. Motzfeldt and N. Shanmugaratnam,

  • DESERT NATIONAL PARK – Biodiversity Reporthttp://forestsclearance.nic.in › wildlife › Userdetail












Authors

Jhabar mal tetarwal* 1 Vinod Bhateshwar2goat chopra1Avinash Bochalya3,

1Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairy Production, Sam Hingginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology and Science, Prayagraj – 211 007.

2Ph.D. Research Fellow Department of Dairy Science and Food Technology Institute of Agricultural Sciences BHU Varanasi -221005, UP India

3Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Dantiwada Agricultural University, Gujarat 385506

1*E-mail: J6350260110@gmail.com

(corresponding author)






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Nigeria is West Africa’s top livestock producer – Minister https://malcolmbluefarm.com/nigeria-is-west-africas-top-livestock-producer-minister/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 19:32:55 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/nigeria-is-west-africas-top-livestock-producer-minister/ By Doris Esa The Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development, Dr Mohammad Abubakar, says Nigeria is West Africa’s top livestock producer. Abubakar said so on Tuesday, opening a two-day summit on the National Livestock Transformation Plan, co-hosted by the Ministry of Agriculture and the Association of Agricultural Correspondents of Nigeria (ACAN ) in Abuja. The […]]]>

By Doris Esa

The Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development, Dr Mohammad Abubakar, says Nigeria is West Africa’s top livestock producer.

Abubakar said so on Tuesday, opening a two-day summit on the National Livestock Transformation Plan, co-hosted by the Ministry of Agriculture and the Association of Agricultural Correspondents of Nigeria (ACAN ) in Abuja.

The theme of the summit is: “Positioning the Nigerian Livestock Industry for the 21st Century Economy: A Critical Look at the National Livestock Transformation Plan (NLTP)”.

The minister said the summit was timely as the country was diversifying its economy with agriculture.

“This summit could not have come at a better time than now, as the country diversifies its economy with agriculture dominating the non-oil sector and recovers from the devastating effect of COVID-19 on the oil industry. breeding,” he said.

Abubakar said most of the Nigerian workforce is engaged in various forms of agricultural enterprises, particularly along the livestock value chain, with over 30% women and young adults. largely dependent on livestock for their income, livelihood and sustenance.

Although information on total production and consumption levels in Nigeria varies widely depending on the source, the livestock sector remains a major component of the agricultural economy.

The minister said it plays an important role in the overall national economy.

“It represents about 2 to 5% of the national GDP and 10% of the agricultural GDP.

Abubakar said recent estimates showed that the livestock sector is endowed with abundant animal resources with about 26.4 million cattle, 88.2 million goats, 50.3 million sheep and 8.9 million of pigs.

“Furthermore, 465 million chickens, 36.4 million ducks, 3.8 million turkeys, 5.5 million rabbits, 353,173 camels and 1,234,284 donkeys (Ministry of Agriculture 2021) are doing so. nation the leading livestock producer in West Africa”,

Abubakar said that despite this potential, the per capita consumption of animal source foods is estimated to be 8 liters of milk, 9 kg of meat and 3.5 kg or 55 eggs per year.

The minister said these were very low levels of consumption compared to global averages of 44 liters of milk and 19 kg of meat, respectively.

“As a result, a huge sum is spent on importing foodstuffs into the country, especially milk and dairy products,” he said.

He said the ministry was broadening and deepening collaboration with a wide range of relevant stakeholders and institutions to address immediate and remote constraints in the livestock sector and to attract increased investment in the sector.

“Given the urgent need to unlock the potential of the livestock industry and accelerate its transformation to address the socio-cultural, security and economic challenges currently facing the country.

”The ministry is excited about the potential promise of this summit on the National Livestock Transformation Plan and we look forward to the outcome to enhance our interventions and synergy towards a successful and rapid transformation of the livestock sector’ ‘, did he declare.

The President of the Association of Agricultural Correspondents of Nigeria (ACAN), Mr. John Oba, described the summit as fitting.

Mr. Oba said the livestock sector was a pillar of the global food system and a contributor to poverty reduction, food security and agricultural development.

“We hope that this summit will provide us, especially those in the Nigerian livestock industry, with the opportunity to showcase our business to the global community.

“This is in order to attract investors and showcase modern, global best practices in livestock management for maximum return,” he said.

The Director of Livestock Services Department in the Ministry of Agriculture, Ms. Winnie Lai-Solarin, speaking on the implementation of the National Livestock Transformation Plan, said that since the launch of the plan, the government and other stakeholders had not given up to make it a success.

In a message of goodwill, the country representative of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Mr. Fred Kaferro, said that the organization would continue to provide technical support to the government to address all aspects of the farming system. (NAN) (www.nannews.ng)

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The menace of stray dogs threatens poultry and livestock in Karur district of Tamil Nadu https://malcolmbluefarm.com/the-menace-of-stray-dogs-threatens-poultry-and-livestock-in-karur-district-of-tamil-nadu/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 20:26:00 +0000 https://malcolmbluefarm.com/the-menace-of-stray-dogs-threatens-poultry-and-livestock-in-karur-district-of-tamil-nadu/ Express press service KARUR: The endemic threat of stray dogs in the district, which is believed to have claimed the lives of 60 goats, sheep and chickens in a single panchayat over the past few weeks, has raised concerns among the public who are now demanding urgent action from the authorities to stem it. Farmers […]]]>

Express press service

KARUR: The endemic threat of stray dogs in the district, which is believed to have claimed the lives of 60 goats, sheep and chickens in a single panchayat over the past few weeks, has raised concerns among the public who are now demanding urgent action from the authorities to stem it.

Farmers and animal herders in the Paramathi panchayat union are a hit lot after stray dogs roaming the area reportedly hunted their more than 60 poultry and livestock in the past few weeks alone.

“With Paramathi being an extremely dry region due to the presence of many stone and sand quarries, agriculture has started to perish, paving the way for animal husbandry,” said Natarajan, an animal herder from the village. of Kattu Munnur from the panchayat union.

After suffering the blows of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have only just embarked on the road to recovery. But the threat of stray dogs has greatly affected our livelihoods, he added, and demanded urgent official action.

Similarly, residents of Gandhigramam in the city are also complaining about stray dogs chasing children in the streets and demanded necessary action. When contacted, Commissioner Ravichandran of the Karur City Municipal Corporation (KCMC) said the body had neutered around 500 dogs in the last month alone.

“In collaboration with a Chennai-based NGO, we routinely sterilize street dogs. The Society is also planning to set up a stray dog ​​sterilization center in the Vangal landfill to carry out ABC (Animal Birth Control) programs and vaccination,” he said.

Dr. Muralitharan, deputy director of livestock department in Kulithalai region and additional manager of Karur, said The new Indian Express that they also carried out the sterilization of the male dogs. “The local body or panchayat council officials should hire a veterinarian with an M VSc degree to carry out ABC and neutering programs by setting up centers in their respective localities,” he said.

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